Is there something for which you are ready to die


No one can be a man who has not discovered something for which he is prepared to die

Jean Paul Sartre The Age of Reason

Friends, is there something you have discovered for which you are prepared to die and would you kindly share with us what this is and if possible why you would be willing to die for it.

About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

36 thoughts on “Is there something for which you are ready to die

  1. ryan59479 says:

    Hmm. In the abstract, I can’t think of a cause or organization or singular idea that I would be willing to die over…

    I would, however, be willing to die for a loved one.

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  2. Mordanicus says:

    The ancient Greeks believed no one could be truly happy till their death, not because they liked death, but because they saw death as the completion of life.

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    • makagutu says:

      I think it is King Croesus who was told that a man can only be known to have been happy once he is died and when Xerxes ransacked Athens, he understood what the philosopher had meant since at the time he was told this, he thought the philosopher a lunatic

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  3. niquesdawson says:

    Mimi bado.

    My life is too large even for myself.

    hehehe.

    Sent from Windows Mail

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  4. john zande says:

    If it would spare their lives then i’d happily march off to my death for my wife or my dogs or my cats.

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  5. exrelayman says:

    As others have said, for the sake of near loved ones I would be willing to die. I would also be willing to die in exchange for a cure for malaria, to eradicate blindness, to end warfare, to end superstitious belief, or even to increase the happiness quotient of humanity en mass by say 10% if such a thing were doable. I guess maybe I don’t value my life too much!

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    • makagutu says:

      I guess so too but then they are worthy causes. I would fight for them too but as much as possible avoid the dying part. Though I don’t think I have a good reason to not want to die for any of the causes maybe some of them will always be with us.

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  6. There are certain principles that I would fight, and if need be, die for. They are rather obvious, highly revered principles (at least in most of the West), such as freedom of speech, liberty, social equality, etc.

    Also, my immediate family and just about any child. Then, from a utilitarian perspective I would certainly die if that meant many others could go on living.

    Of course, we can’t know if these are true until, or unless, I have been tested. On the other hand, I would prefer to survive while also seeing the above come to fruition.

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  7. Charity says:

    Makagutu, you present an interesting topic. I don’t know, my priorities have changed a bit since becoming an atheist a year and a half ago. I wouldn’t give up my life for my parents, I’m not even sure about my sisters anymore because I can’t remember the last year I was remotely close to any of them, no matter how much I tried. (I may begin to work on that again, not sure though.)

    Mr. Amazing and our kids, Intellectual and Nature Lover, would definitely be more than enough of a cause, individually or any combination of the three, to lay down my life. I know my husband well, he wouldn’t allow for it, he would totally take the fall.

    Now that I don’t believe in God, Jesus or Holy Spirit, I don’t believe in the Devil, heaven or hell either. It would cause me to consider my priorities a little more than what I used to. Since this dramatic change I don’t believe in an ultimate sacrifice of anyone’s life for specific causes that would find a cure, stop wars or end disease. I believe much of that need for someone to be the proverbial sacrificial lamb for the better good of humanity stems from many forms of religion and mythology, especially that of Christ. I really don’t believe in that.

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    • makagutu says:

      Oh yes Charity, you say it so well. Why sacrifice this one life we have got to end war. Why should the life of one person be taken for the good of others? Why can’t we collectively end these problems avoiding the death part as long as we live?

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      • Charity says:

        Exactly, makagutu! Non-believers often say that religion is the cause of most wars, I don’t agree. Political leaders use religion to start wars because they know their citizens are gullible. They have their own ulterior motives to begin war. They know that most of us believe that “sacrifice” is necessary for the “better good” of a country because of religion’s influence. (Not to mention, politicians have always put their spin and/or actual words and influence into religious scriptures, doctrines and laws in order to have more control over their subjects.)

        I think Obama and Kerry realize that American citizens are starting to catch on to this whole concept because of Bush’s trickery in the search for WMDs in the Middle East. As many as 80 to 90% of Americans do not want to go into Syria. Obama and Kerry, realizing how we’re catching on to the whole religious ploy, are trying to appeal to our sentiment instead. The whole “what about the children?” plea is coming into play. They’ll more than likely find a way to go to war anyway.

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        • makagutu says:

          The leaders know that it is easy to get people to support war when you bring an element of religion. Our god against their god. I think men fight each other because they are unreasonable.

          There has to be a peaceful way of dealing with the Syrian crisis before it gets deadly syrias!

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  8. Sonel says:

    Very interesting topic Mak. Without any doubt I will say that I will die for my children. If I had to choose between their death and mine, I will choose mine for sure. 😀

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  9. Arkenaten says:

    Right now I’m dying for a coffee, though I wouldn’t take this too literally.
    Can’t think of any cause celebre I’d die for.

    I’m with Sonel on this one. My kids and my wife.

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  10. One thing I’d die for is exploration. My husband and I’d volunteer for a one-way mission to deep space, another planet, etc. Alas, with my crappy eyesight, and his health issues, no one wants us as astronauts.

    I’d die for my husband, but that often seems like a catch-22 since we both aren’t interested in going on without the other.

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    • makagutu says:

      Yours is a real catch-22 situation.

      But dying for exploration unless you die while in the process will be pointless don’t you think? I’d gladly be part of a one way crew to outer space

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  11. Hi there, Mak! Another interesting question….The only thing I can think of right now, is the Greek comedy of Alcestis, who agreed to die instead of her husband. She asked him to make certain promises and came back from the underworld to find he hadn’t kept them…Beware of promises, I’d say. 😉

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    • makagutu says:

      Hello my friend, I hope you have been well, I was just going to drop you email then here you are!

      That’s really quite interesting. But unless it’s a question of honour, she would have died in vain, it is hard to keep a promise especially since we can’t be in control of the future leave alone the present.

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      • I agree with you. It seems silly that people are asking for promises to be kept when they are dead. Alcestis could have decided to do it, or not do it, without making any claims…but then there wouldn’t have been much of a story to tell!

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  12. Alex Autin says:

    While that quote appears to be quite noble, and may have been for the time, today it seems to taste a bit of politically-correct passive-aggressiveness. You know – herd mentality, where an individual or group declares loudly what the definition of a man is then shames anyone who doesn’t think or act accordingly. Sort of like saying ‘Either you’re part of the solution, or you’re part of the problem’ – which basically says think and act as I do, or you’re a problem. Bullying through the use of clever sounding slogans.
    Personally I can’t think of a single cause for which I would give my life. As for dying to save a loved one, it would depend on the situation – and hopefully a situation which I wont be faced with any time soon, if ever.

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    • makagutu says:

      Hello Alex, I agree with your analysis about the quote being fallacious, to some point, beyond that, however, given the responses I have received, it is a worthwhile question to help identify that one thing a person values much more than their lives.

      As for causes, I can’t think of any to die for. Dying for a loved one would depend on the situation and as I have said if I can avoid the dying part I would, I still find life to beautiful to die at the moment.

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