And now to enrage you!


I will just copy the post from avaaz. It has been in my email for a few days now.

By now we’ve all heard this story, but it’s no less shocking: 16 year old Liz was walking home from her grandfather’s funeral when she was ambushed by six men who took turns raping her and then threw her unconscious body down a 6-meter toilet pit.Their punishment? Police had them mow their station lawn, then let them go free!

Liz’s horror story has sent shockwaves through Kenya and now politicians and the police are under pressure to respond. But women’s groups say nothing will truly change unless the government is put under the spotlight. They are calling on us urgently to help ensure justice is done and that Liz’s nightmare marks a turning-point in Kenya’s rape epidemic.

Nobody has been brought to justice — not the rapists, and not the police. Today, we change that. Let’s stand with Liz right now, before her attackers and the police escape.Click below to get justice for Liz and help make sure no girl anywhere suffers this violence:

According to the girl’s mother, after they were set free, the rapists returned to Liz’s home to taunt the family. They acted like they were above the law, and they had good reason to think so. Because of ridiculous bureaucratic requirements, the police logged Liz’s attack as mere “assault” and asked her mother to “clean her up”, destroying key forensic evidence. Now her rapists are free and Liz is in a wheelchair.

Liz’s story is an extreme example of a much bigger problem. Two thirds of Kenyan school girls and half of school boys have been sexually abused. And earlier this year, a landmark court ruling found police guilty of failing to do their jobs and ordered them to uphold Kenya’s strict anti-rape laws. Rape is illegal everywhere, but too often these laws are just not enforced by the men charged with protecting our daughters. Beginning with Liz, we can change that.

The police claim that they don’t have the money or training to uphold the law. But you don’t need much training to know that cutting the grass is no punishment for rape. If we can help ensure these rapists and police are held to account, we can set a precedent that will compel police to treat rape as a serious crime, not a misdemeanour.

Here is the petition

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About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

24 thoughts on “And now to enrage you!

  1. Mordanicus says:

    This is really horrible. Moving lawns is a suitable punishment for vandals and ilk like that, but not more dangerous criminals. Those have to be separated from society.

    Like

  2. I have already signed the petition. The story just sickens.Thank you for spreading the word but I couldn’t tick like.

    Like

  3. Signed. It was encouraging to see those number clicking up as I was filling in my info. This you for posting this, it’s sickening.

    Like

  4. mixedupmeme says:

    Too many stories with the same ending all over the world.

    Like

  5. Mak, thank you so much for bringing this to our attention. Signed.

    My heart grieves for Liz and countless other girls and women around the world who don’t have a voice due to corruption, apathy, and a lack of empathy. Prosecuting individuals will only affect the individuals, but the cultures and attitudes towards girls and women have to change before this epidemic, this horrific violation of human rights can be abated.

    Thanks again for sharing the article and the petition. I will pass it around.

    ““What sane species would treat half of its members — and the very half which gives birth to the whole species — with such contempt and injustice? ~Steve Taylor, Psychology Today

    Like

  6. aguywithoutboxers says:

    Words cannot describe how I feel after reading this. Signed! Atrocities like this must end, NOW!

    Like

  7. fojap says:

    Because of ridiculous bureaucratic requirements, the police logged Liz’s attack as mere “assault”

    The strange thing about these sorts of stories, if you can call anything about these stories which are unfortunately all too common “strange”, is that if it had been an assault, rather than a sexual assault, it would probably have been taken more seriously. I can’t say that for sure because I don’t know anything about Kenya’s criminal laws, but even without the rape, beating someone until he or she is unconcious, throwing him or her into a toilet pit and having that person wind up in a wheelchair would probably be taken more seriously than having the perpetrators mow the lawn. Sometimes, because of this, I believe we should prosecute sexual assault as plain “assault.”

    Like

  8. Real real me says:

    Petition signed.
    It’s really terrible what the girl went through. I wonder how come the police doesn’t feel responsible for not properly punishing the men, if they see that the laws aren’t strict, they can do the action again.

    Like

  9. shelldigger says:

    Having raised a daughter, this gets my blood roiling. Absolutely disgusted right now. No excuse for this kind of thing to be acceptable in todays society, no matter what flag you are under.

    There was a blog I posted on a while back on the definition of evil. I think this qualifies. The fact the the guilty parties later taunted the family… that is what makes otherwise good men do things they might later regret.

    My empathy to the family.

    Like

    • makagutu says:

      The prospects of it happening to anyone alone is disturbing, that it was allowed to happen and nothing done to ensure the society is protected from them is alarming.

      Like

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