The good man Jesus and scoundrel Christ


by P. Pullman

Thanks my friend LoT for always reminding me to read the books by Pullman.

I know it is quite some work to herd cats, and I wouldn’t try even if you paid me to. But for those of who like reading, this is an interesting read.

Pullman tells of the circumstance of Jesus and Christ’s birth, their growing up and their differences as children

I like the conversation at the poolside.

And the prayer of Jesus is out of this world. Part of the prayer, which most of us would agree with

‘Lord, if I thought you were listening, I’d pray for this above all: that any church set up in your name should remain poor, and powerless, and modest. That it should wield no authority except that of love. That it should never cast anyone out. That it should own no property and make no laws. That it should not condemn, but only forgive.

Go read the book. You will love it, that you can trust me.

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About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

51 thoughts on “The good man Jesus and scoundrel Christ

  1. john zande says:

    We all don’t read as fast as you, my learned friend. 😉

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  2. Mak, you slay me. Based on the email exchange 13 hours ago, you hadn’t read anything by Pullman. Do you ever sleep? LOL

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    • makagutu says:

      Yes and soundly.
      I think I should take more walks in the evening after work 😀

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    • Noel my friend, this is what’s become of my hopes that ya’ll read Pullman’s Trilogy? You grabbed a shorty and lead astray the whole flock☺
      Your Holiness, I am ashamed to admit I haven’t read yet the book you just did read.
      It must be the stomach sickness I get when I have to read about this jesus, which is still fresh after quite a few years, and keeps me from reading it, even if I know it’s from PP…
      But it can’t replace the seismic content of the Trilogy, trust me on this one☺

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      • “You grabbed a shorty and lead astray the whole flock☺”

        LOL Rom, If truth be told I mentioned to Noel in an email that you had recommended the Trilogy to me, and I was going to read them. This was the result. 😀

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      • makagutu says:

        My friend, his holiness has no intention to mislead the flock, especially being they are cats, this would be difficult. His intention is to challenge the other usurper to the throne who sits at the Vatican and wears pink prada shoes, to entertain his readers and where possible to educate them.
        I realize that many cats were affected negatively by religion and I will be careful not to awaken such memories. For me in a way, church wasted my Sundays, I would have a bigger library by now.
        I plan to read the trilogy and I will appraise you on my thoughts.
        I trust you on that,

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  3. violetwisp says:

    I was just thinking of getting it but the first review I read says ” I’m a Christian and I think this is one of the best books I’ve read in a very long time.” It’s put me off. The next one says “A beautifully written retelling of the story of Jesus Christ.” I’m put off further. It just doesn’t sound very original!

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    • makagutu says:

      Well, it is true it is a retelling of the story of Jesus with a mix of some passages from the gospel of Thomas I think and in a way that is quite original I think.
      Maybe you should just try and read it and form your opinion of it.

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      • violetwisp says:

        I’d like to, I love Pullman but for some reason reading about the Jesus character doesn’t appeal to me, even if it comes highly recommended. Must be a deconversion reflex.

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        • Violet, I can relate to the deconversion reflex. For what it’s worth,here’s a limited preview.

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          • violetwisp says:

            Thanks, I was sucked in by the first fluid words but then the nauseous reflex kicked in. How odd, too many long and tedious Sunday morning memories tied up in those characters.

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          • Not odd, really. I can actually become physically ill, that wrenching feeling in the pit of my stomach, when reading passages from the Bible that are posted on blogs. Especially when they are posted by Christians to make their point. After reading about Religious Trauma Syndrome, I now understand why. It’s not so much about my own experience but a reminder of how people are so easily sucked into the mind control vortex.

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          • makagutu says:

            I can identify with this to a point. Sunday mornings for me were wasted listening to often boring sermons.

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        • makagutu says:

          Maybe. I think for me I read reviews once I have finished reading a book, that is if I actually read any reviews.
          Part of the question in this book is about history and truth. If we embellish stories to something that could have happened is it still true.
          I get your points though and agree with you somewhat

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          • I did read one review , and was intrigued.

            “In this ingenious and spellbinding retelling of the life of Jesus, Philip Pullman revisits the most influential story ever told. He offers a radical new take on the myths and mysteries of the gospels and of the church that has shaped the course of the last two millennia.

            The Good Man Jesus and the Scoundrel Christ throws fresh light on who Jesus was and asks the reader questions that will continue to reverberate long after the final page is turned. For above all, this book is about how stories become stories.”

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      • I agree — because as you mentioned to me in the email — the conversation at the poolside and the Jesus prayer, just before the arrest, is quite telling. I’m looking forward to reading it. You’ve got me intrigued now. I’ll that one first before I read the Pullman’s Trilogy. My guess is that Christians won’t see what you saw because they are viewing it through their religious filter.

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  4. Tish Farrell says:

    This is indeed a great book. Philip Pullman is always his own man.

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