where he pleads guilty to a traffic offence and is fined by the court


There was so much mist/ fog I could hardly see beyond 20m

There was so much mist/ fog I could hardly see beyond 20m

The ugly court house

The ugly court house

Fog/ mist where I stopped to have breakfast

Fog/ mist where I stopped to have breakfast

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About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

65 thoughts on “where he pleads guilty to a traffic offence and is fined by the court

  1. pinkagendist says:

    As a professional traffic offender, welcome to the club!!!! 😀

    Like

  2. shelldigger says:

    The last time I got a ticket, it was from a State Trooper, he told me, “I’ll give ya’s 10 mph over the limit, after that I write tickets.” So now I keep it @ 6-9 mph over hwy, and limit myself to 5 over in city driving. In a town I try to look at it like “what if my kids and I lived here?”

    +1 on welcome to the club 😉

    Cool pics. That was some thick fog.

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    • makagutu says:

      In market areas, I drive at very low speeds just in case a person decides to jump into the road. On the highways it is a herculean task to keep to the 100kph speed limit.
      There are places you could hardly see 10 metres ahead

      Like

    • archaeopteryx1 says:

      Shelldigger, there was a reason he said that – courts, at least in America, have established that radar can be as much as to miles per hour off, and therefore, any speed detected that is less than that above the sped limit, is automatically not accepted in court. This is where cruise-control comes in handy!

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      • makagutu says:

        When I grow up, my car will have cruise control.
        I however think it borders on pettiness to arraign someone in court for doing 110/100. Whoever makes laws need sometime of common sense to be reasonable

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  3. themodernidiot says:

    Oh I’m so sorry they had to spoil such pretty country with a ticket. I am trying to see, is there something in the bush on the left, about third from the tree?

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  4. I recently got a speeding ticket, the first in over 20 years and I deserved it : )

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    • makagutu says:

      You must be such a careful driver!
      I think mine wasn’t deserved and they wasted a lot of my time that could have been used productively elsewhere

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      • No I tend to have a lead foot on open roads and still one it if no one is around me. I am not reckless and an excellent driver but I still deserved it. I was well over 40 miles over the limit and he also gave me a “break” Smiles. I paid it and slowed down! 🚘

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        • makagutu says:

          Ah I see.
          Stopping and fining someone for doing 10kph above the limit is to me bordering on insanity where he could have easily have flagged me down and told me to observe the speed limit.

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          • Yes I think that is just testosterone sadly! ( or a power trip, or both)

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          • archaeopteryx1 says:

            Actually, traffic fines are a great source of income for some governments – in some places here in the States, it has been discovered that some police departments give their patrolmen actual quotas they’re expected to meet each month.

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          • makagutu says:

            Makes sense

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          • Hiya, you know you are correct. I almost wrote that. I have some friends that are State Troopers and it is indeed revenue especially for out of town travelers who will not come back and fight the ticket. : )

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          • archaeopteryx1 says:

            Exactly.
            Many years ago, I was driving my parents, first wife, and son, from the mid-US to California, where relatives lived. On a two-lane highway – traffic on the right side of the road going one way, on the left, another – I found myself third in line behind a large truck that was slowly making its way up a long hill. The car immediately behind the truck decided to make its move, pulled out around the truck, and seeing no traffic coming from the other direction, proceeded to pass. I decided to pass the car in front of me, and fill in the space previously occupied by the lead car, so that I could pass the truck too, when the next opportunity afforded itself.

            As I pulled out into the other, empty lane, three things happened simultaneously – the car in front of me, despite seeing what I intended doing, moved up to fill in the space it was my intention to occupy, the car behind me pulled forward to occupy the space I had just vacated, leaving me no option but to try passing the truck myself, and lastly, a car came over the top of the hill, in the lane I was in. I hit the gas, and got around the truck, but the driver in the other car, coming from the opposite direction, panicked and ran his right wheels off the road before passing us and continuing on.

            Likely, he stopped at the next town and called the State Troopers, not having been there to see what had stranded me in his lane in the first place, as a little later, a State Trooper pulled me over and insisted I follow him to the local police station, where he further insisted I pay a fine for reckless driving. Had I been local, I have no doubt I could easily have gone to court, explained the situation to a jury – that I was left with no option but to pass the truck, though it had not been my original intention – and been exonerated, but as it would have been weeks, if not months, before a trial date was set, and it would have involved me returning hundreds of miles to attend, and the bail bond would have equaled or exceeded the fine, it was simpler to pay the fine. Another tourist bites the dust. Tucumcari, New Mexico may be a nice place to live, but I wouldn’t want to visit there, again.

            Like

          • What a story. You know it seems highly unfair for a Trooper to take the word of someone else, sight unseen without even witnessing the incident?

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          • archaeopteryx1 says:

            Unfair, but lucrative.

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          • makagutu says:

            I think our government is using it as a revenue line as well.

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          • makagutu says:

            A power trip maybe but still an act worthy of condemnation.

            Like

  5. john zande says:

    What did you do, Brother?

    Like

    • makagutu says:

      I was stopped for doing 110 where speed limit is 100 paid a cash bail on Sat and was to appear in court today where I was fined

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      • john zande says:

        Bail and a court appearance for a minor speeding ticket? That’s fucked-up, excuse my language. Don’t the constabulary and judiciary have better (more pressing) things to occupy their time….

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      • ubi dubium says:

        Bail for a speeding ticket? My spouse is a magistrate (in the US), who issues warrants and sets bail, and he never sees minor traffic offenses. The police just write a ticket and send people on their way. It takes at least drunk driving or reckless driving, or something of that kind to be hauled in to the jail and have bail set. Of course, we have so much traffic here that if speeders were arrested the courts would be doing nothing else all day!

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        • makagutu says:

          Bail and court appearance! It is insanity my friend.
          No wonder there are cases here that have never been heard for so long since the magistrates are busy milking people of their earned cash to fill govt coffers.

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  6. archaeopteryx1 says:

    I defended myself in three court cases, and won two out of the three – in the third, the cop lied on the stand, and who are they going to believe? (He has since been fired, but for another reason – karma rules!)

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    • makagutu says:

      I told the magistrate it could have been true that I was driving at the speed posted am not sure and that it would be fair if her court let me go home. The lady goes ahead and fines me!
      This mentality that people must be punished is a sickness.

      Like

      • shelldigger says:

        With traffic citations it is not a matter of punishment so much as a matter of them transferring money from your wallet to theirs. I guess you could call that punishment, I see it as parastism. They have an entire system dedicated to the purpose.

        …and having to post bond on a traffic citation is absurd.

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        • makagutu says:

          It is a country of the absurd things. You know where they pay ghosts while people are dying of hunger and where police officers are posted on the roadside to ensure the security of the chief clown’s motorcade and elsewhere guys are butchering each other on where the boundary should be.

          I call it punishment but I could as well have called it theft albeit without violence

          Like

  7. archaeopteryx1 says:

    When I lived for a few years in Mexico, I was once stopped for running a stop sign on my way to taking birthday party treats home to my daughter’s party. The stop sign was attached to a light pole 18 feet in the air – who looks for a stop sign 18 feet in the air?!!!!

    I tried explaining that I had to get to my daughter’s party, and the cop explained to me that the driver of the car is not detained – the car is – and that I was free to go, but my car wasn’t. I then explained that I was 12 miles from home and had ice cream in the bag, and only after a great deal of whining, which in bad Spanish, isn’t pretty, was I allowed to proceed.

    Like

    • makagutu says:

      You must know how to plead your case.
      Our cops are usually very unreasonable and here am being generous

      Like

      • archaeopteryx1 says:

        “You must know how to plead your case.”
        Yeah, I cry a lot.
        But seriously, it was a young kid, basically a rookie, and I think he was trying to get me to offer him a bribe, but when I didn’t, he didn’t know where to go from there.

        When I first moved to Mexico, we had rented our house and gone back to LA for our furniture, in a large, U-Haul truck. At the border crossing into Mexico, the Border guard told me I needed to pull my truck to the side, into a special inspection area, where other guards would take out everything from my truck to inspect it. Of course, they had no intention of putting it back, that would have been MY job.

        The guard added quickly, “Or, you give me twenty dollars, ees OK!” I don’t have to tell you which option I chose.

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  8. archaeopteryx1 says:

    In the States, where I now live, I currently have two arrest warrants out for me, in two nearby counties, but as long as I stay out of those counties, I’m home free – life on the edge! Gotta love it.

    Like

  9. archaeopteryx1 says:

    Just read this – gotta share it before I turn in:
    When a Mormon church elder told British writer and comedian Stephen Fry that he would be reunited with his entire family after death if he become a Mormon, he replied “What happens if you’re good?” He was asked to leave Salt Lake City immediately.

    Like

  10. Sonel says:

    That is why I don’t drive. I’ll just end up in jail Mak. 😀

    Like

  11. Eric Alagan says:

    In Singapore, the camera’s are rigged to go off if one exceeds the speed limit by 10 kph. Sounds fair for regular vehicles, I reckon.

    Like

    • makagutu says:

      I don’t know, but I think for me I find no reason to fine someone for driving fast unless it can be shown he has risked people’s lives along the way.

      Like

  12. Arkenaten says:

    I spent the day in the nick after my wife forgot to pay a meter fine of twenty rand.
    She also hid the damn summons!
    Then , one morning at 7.00 am, a cop rocks up at our house and hauls my arse off to jail because the car was registered in my name.
    I kid you not. All for want of 20 cents in a parking meter. lol
    I was in a large holding cell beneath Johannesburg Magistrates court with a whole bunch of creepy felons, including some bloke on a rape charge and two blokes from Krugarsdorp who were caught with 500,000 rand counterfeit 50 rand notes in the boot of their Cortina.

    My case was heard ten minutes before the courts closed for the day.
    Cost me 350 rand. That was 25 years ago!
    I am considering forgiving my wife this year. What do you think?
    😉

    Like

    • archaeopteryx1 says:

      I KNOW you don’t want ME to answer that —

      Like

    • makagutu says:

      There is a long joke, you could have heard it, about a fellow who makes the judge’s daughter pregnant. The judge gives him two options either marry his daughter or jail for 25 years. The dude opts to marry the damsel. On their 25th anniversary, the lady finds the dude weeping uncontrollably. She inquires what the matter is when they should be celebrating and he says had he gone to jail, he would be free today.

      Maybe you can put off the forgiving to next year 🙂

      Do magistrates and those they work for think?

      Like

    • emmylgant says:

      Oh! I think you should, considerng she gave you a great story to tell at parties, reunions, meetings, etc…. Consider the entertainment value of the whole episode –as you retell it– include the fine… after 25 years, you should almost thank her! 😉

      Like

  13. emmylgant says:

    I forgot! I really like the fog pictures. They set a creepy mood… mischief afoot…

    Like

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