creation of gods


A great deal of intelligence must have gone to the making up of a Greek polytheism, the expenditure of intelligence is much less lavish when people have only one god.

F. Nietzsche in We Philologists

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About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

52 thoughts on “creation of gods

  1. I like Roman and Greek mythology. And that’s just it, is it not? Mythology. Who is to say what is myth and what is real? For one religion to decry other religions as untrue or mythical is the height of intolerance. I have a fine book about mythology, roman, Greek, Egyptian you name it, but nowhere are the big three mentioned.

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    • makagutu says:

      History is most times written by the victors. When the Christians conquered antiquity they became intolerant of the sources of their religion. They sought to separate themselves as much as possible from the gods of antiquity. It is all myth, and that is why I like my copy of the bible. In its introduction it says the bible or at least the OT is a Hebrew story of how they saw themselves and that is how it should be. It is a story of a people.

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  2. aguywithoutboxers says:

    My ancestors were very imaginative when creating their deities. However, they didn’t invent them to be infallible. They knew when to stop. Good morning, my Nairobi brother (afternoon, to you, there). πŸ™‚

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  3. john zande says:

    Polytheism writes itself. Just watch three weeks of any Brazilian soap opera and you pretty much have an excellent god-family story line. Dress the characters in diamond-dust cloaks, toss in a miracle or two, and viola!

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  4. I’ve come to the conclusion that the bible is just as “made up” as the pantheon of Greek myths. However, it’s only about one tenth as creative.

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  5. ladysighs says:

    Young children are very creative. I would teach a unit on holidays to my second graders. It was mostly about how their families celebrated and why. Both religious and secular holidays were included. At the end of the study I would ask the children to invent a new holiday. They were to include what it was to be called, when and why it was celebrated etc etc. I remember the funnier ones like Bubble Gum Day and Messy Room Week. Your blog post made me recall that there were some new religious holidays with a combination of holy practices.
    So if you are looking to create a new god, I would definitely suggest asking kids.

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  6. nannus says:

    Instead I think the amount of thinking that went into the abrahamic god was much larger because it has so many contradictions. The old gods where neither omnipotent nor omniscient, they had faults etc. In such a pantheon, theology becomes easier (and more entertaining).

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    • makagutu says:

      Nannus interesting idea. With a pantheon of gods, contradictions are dealt away with easily.
      One god must be open to contradictions. And will be likely confused on what wish to grant.

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      • nannus says:

        Instead of a contradictory god, you have gods with contradicting interests and tendencies, leading to all kinds of interesting stories.
        The wish thing is one of the contradictory aspects of this god. The omnipotent creator of the universe will hardly grant people the right to influence him, so what is the point of praying for something? Nevertheless, people try to bend this god into their direction by praying as hard as they can. πŸ™‚

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  7. Aquileana says:

    So true… Hence morality and monotheism are related… For further details Check out Friedrich Nietzsche’s “The Genealogy of The Moral”.
    Best wishes, dear Makagutu, Aquileana πŸ˜€

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