Observations and insights


A public service announcement to help theists mainly.

1. There is no part in the theory of evolution that says we evolved from monkeys. We have a common ancestor. That isn’t the same thing as evolving from monkey.

2. That the chances of life occurring naturally are slim doesn’t mean it didn’t happen.

3. There is no evidence for your Jesus. Stop behaving like you have evidence

4. Muslims, the Koran is not evidence for Allah or Mo[Piss be upon him].

5. And please, please, before you expect us to take your books seriously, demonstrate they are divinely inspired

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About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

31 thoughts on “Observations and insights

  1. I like how you can use just a few words to say so much. I can’t do that. Good one, Noel.

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  2. emmylgant says:

    Short and not so sweet. I think you’re getting a wee bit testy… OK, crabby. .. Actually more like p **d off.
    But still unshakably logical.
    and funny.

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  3. “Stop behaving like you have evidence” – this made me laugh, you’re telling them off good and proper there, and fair enough too. Succinct.

    – sonmi – not monkeying about on the Cloud

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  4. Five excellent points. Christian fundamentalists, in particular, often lump together all primate species under the term “monkey.” This is completely inaccurate. The taxonomical order of Primates consists of humans, apes, monkeys, lemurs (plus lorisoids), and tarsiers. And, the Great Apes (family Hominidae: chimpanzees, gorillas, and orangutans) are genetically closer to humans than they are to monkeys and the lesser primate species.

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  5. john zande says:

    #2 We have no idea how many genesis’s might have occurred, or how frequently they might be occurring. On no less than twenty-four separate occasions the earth has witnessed the simplest of single-celled life leap from its primal state to that of multi-cellular activity, marking this transition to organic complexity as something fundamentally pedestrian , if not entirely unavoidable. If that leap is pedestrian, then the step before is, well, just one step removed from an almost given.

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    • makagutu says:

      the argument is akin to saying the chances of winning a lottery are one in several millions, but someone still wins. How can they forget this. And when they talk of life, where do they stop? Viruses, bacteria, or where?

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Nice. Short. A tad pissed off, and right to the point. #2 really gets me. How the frig does anyone know if life occurring in our universe is rare or super common? We have access to almost none of our own galaxy and can see far less of the universe than that.There are 200 billion galaxies out there, some with close to a trillion stars in them, each with their own orbiting worlds. Who’s to say there aren’t entire galaxies filled with intelligent, sentient life forms? Who the fuck knows! The evidence points to life existing elsewhere because it exists here. Christians argue the rarity of life because it makes em feel special, like god’s chosen ones. F them. They’re not rare. They’re very common and very annoying, unfortunately. Like you’ve said, they’ve no evidence at all for their god existing. Well said, my friend.

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    • mark says:

      I think that perhaps some Christians argue for the rarity of life because the realities of accepting the extremely high probability that life is common throughout the universe throws up a lot of problematic figures.
      One day when I was bored I decided to use the Drake equation which is used to estimate the number of detectable extraterrestrial civilizations in the Milky Way galaxy combined with Earth’s murder rate statistics and the estimated amount of galaxies in the universe to come up with a rough estimated figure of how many murders occur in the universe every second. The number I came up with was 4.7 billion and that’s every second. And that was using the lowest end of estimated figures for Drake’s equation and the amount of possible galaxies, in other words it’s more than likely hundreds if not thousands of times higher.
      Even the most devout Christians would be quite reluctant to use the usual get out clause of “working in mysterious ways”, in fact I’d be more willing to talk with a Christian who said something like “Well he’s obviously a very busy man” as a reason for how it can be possible.
      The acceptance of life being common throughout the universe has far too many consequences that would make belief in a god so unbelievably hard to defend. Also, despite all the evidence presented I am not some morbid person who has far too much time on his hands. (well, perhaps sometimes, but not all the time honest, although, my ways are mysterious; even to me.)

      Excellent post as always, more food for thought.

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      • “Christians argue for the rarity of life..” They argue for the rarity of life because if life isn’t rare, they’re not special. That’s it. There is evidence for life existing anywhere but here, but with a universe consisting of hundreds of billions of galaxies with hundreds of billions of stars and trillions upon trillions of planets, my hypothesis would be that life exists elsewhere and some of it is intelligent and/or sentiment. Might not be a bloody cell elsewhere but here, but if we ever come to realize that, after exploring the entire universe to truly see if it’s true, it will have nothing to do with the specialty of Jesus, christians, or the christian bible. Of the two things for which no evidence exists, I think the safer bet is on life, even intelligent life, existing elsewhere in the universe rather than the christian (and which one?) god existing in an invisible heaven “somewhere”. Christians aren’t special. They are as common as sand is to a beach, and nothing they say is backed by reason, decent morality, or human kindness. $Amen$ and praise be to Allah, the only true God. 🙂

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      • makagutu says:

        excellent comment Mark.
        I am going to start saying, I work in mysterious ways

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    • makagutu says:

      thanks my friend. They are claiming much more than they have the evidence for

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  7. You should read my six part series on the koran.. lol of course the Christians didn’t see me set up for the six part series on the bible which is still a ways off from done but coming along anyway.

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  8. A Guy Without Boxers says:

    Excellent truisms for everyone, my Nairobi brother! Have a super safe and fun weekend! Much love and many naked hugs! I’ve missed you! 🙂

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  9. exrelayman says:

    Given the part of the world you live in, I would ease up a bit on the ‘piss be upon him’ sort of talk. I desire you to be here blogging for a long time.
    Logic and reason – yes; inflammatory insult – risky and unnecessary. The religion of peace is frightening! Stay healthy. I hope my advice does not offend.

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    • makagutu says:

      I live in a pretty safe place. At least we don’t have mad people in the streets hacking people to death.
      I will avoid members of the peaceful religion though

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  10. Peter says:

    Hi Mak, since my confidence in the Bible crumbled I continue to ask Christians I come across to explain just why they consider the Bible to be a divine book. To the extent anyone has seriously tried to answer the question, they have sought to justify the divine nature of the Bible by quoting Bible verses, which really does not help.

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    • makagutu says:

      Hi Peter, always nice to hear from you.
      How else do you think they would defend that claim?
      It is the same with the Muslim saying the Koran is divine because it says so in the Koran.

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  11. shelldigger says:

    5 little things. All good examples of why reason is preferable to myth. As well as great examples for many who have succumbed to the brain rot. I like it when you can take well reasoned ideas and apply them to multiple categories.

    Like

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