Case for socialism


Here is a good case why we should consider socialism. I am not sure this will be possible in the US of A where in 2019, some nuts still think to call someone a communist is an insult so they call all those they don’t agree with commies.

About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

56 thoughts on “Case for socialism

  1. jim- says:

    One thing that constantly nags at me is capitalismโ€™s way of forcing participation through its inflation. Itโ€™s a stressful struggle to keep up, and if you donโ€™t? You lose everything.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Mak, you are a leftist, socialist libtard! Obviously you don’t value the things in life that matter: money, more money, even more money, power, winning, crushing those who disagree with you beneath your boots, Jesus, money, guns, money to buy guns, America, which was founded by Christ who was a rich, white capitalist, and most importantly money. You libtards just don’t get it. Please, stop posting such ridiculous posts. They trigger me and are a slap in the face to my obviously correct world views. Yours in Jesus Christ, The Arm Chair Pontificator–A Christ loving capitalist who hates libtards, socialists and commies.

    Liked by 4 people

  3. I’m for any system as long as I get to be king in it. Or at least a very important official.

    Liked by 4 people

  4. renudepride says:

    I live in the USA but don’t act like the majority here. I don’t label anyone a communist but to those I don’t agree with – such as the current, illegal president – I simply refer to them as an “ass-hole.” After all, we all have an anus! ๐Ÿ™‚ Naked hugs, my Kenyan brother!

    Liked by 2 people

  5. I’m somewhere in between a democratic socialist and a social democrat – meaning that I see modern capitalism as fundamentally flawed, but I am willing to explore options to reform it. Furthermore, I oppose all forms of authoritarianism be it right-wing fascism or left-wing communism.

    Liked by 3 people

    • basenjibrian says:

      This is a good description of myself. As horrific as capitalism can be, socialism has too often devolved into the very anomie-dominant, bureaucratic system the linked author complains about. I still feel that although the Kochroach class deserves to be stepped on, I am not sure turning everything over to left wing ideological purists either. (I know there are other options along the way. ๐Ÿ™‚ )Social democracy may be the best compromise.

      Liked by 1 person

    • makagutu says:

      Whatever system delivers justice and equity, in whatever name, I am all for it.

      Liked by 2 people

      • basenjibrian says:

        Defining “Justice” and “Equity” is the problem, though. Being a bit of a gym rat as well as a distance cyclist, I hang around some interesting YouTube sites and non-political blogs. There is now, apparently, a new “Fat Acceptance” movement that demands total acceptance. Their definition of justice and equity is reconfiguration of seating and spaces to fit 300 pounders who, though reduced to riding around in a golf cart, are perfectly healthy. Healthy, I tell you. And anyone who says otherwise is “thin privileging”. So…what is the definition of justice and equity? Should aircraft be redesigned to provide justice to the 300 pound woman? Should health care be free when one insists on eating a Fat Elvis type diet?

        Like

        • makagutu says:

          I saw a Bill Maher sketch this morning where he says that asking for fat acceptance is BS. And I also remember a Carlin clip about how big Americans are

          Liked by 1 person

          • basenjibrian says:

            There is a hard core macho fitness blogger I follow Every Damn Day Fitness who reviewed the Bill Maher sketch. His focus is on health, not hating people. Even the new Warriors for the Wideload group. And I agree with him totally that many of them (us!) have serious food addiction issues that, in my case, mean marginal bad cholesterol levels and skirting with bad blood sugar. So he is just furious with the new irrationality of the “fat acceptance” gurus.

            His video channel, along with Obese to Beast, has been arguing with the Social Justice Warriors of Obesity for a while now. They point out the hate and judgmentalism of some of the leaders, who complain about “Thin Priviledge”. And the latter group can be downright shrill in their denunciations of anyone who suggests that no, a 350 pound dude riding around in a scooter is not healthy. Even if for the moment one is reasonably mobile and the problems have not caught up with you yet!

            I know once commenter “tiledb” here (not seen him here lately, but he is active on other “sister” blogs) seems to be recently going a bit off the deep end with his Muslim-hate, but the dangers of group identity politics was (is) always one of his themes that I somewhat agreed with. To an extent. I mean, if everyone is a victim, of course you are going to be getting justifying morbid obesity as a social justice cause. Along with, let’s be honest, some of the Nazis who disingenuously use SJW rhetoric to (falsely) justify their nonsense. I think his warnings about that focus in politics were well taken????

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            • makagutu says:

              I think many people are eating bad foods and a lot of it. This has to be addressed.
              And as Bill Maher says, we don’t have drug acceptance or alcohol acceptance. But political correctness is why you can’t tell your friend, hey you are fat and do something about it. In fact, you will be friendless very quickly

              Like

  6. Ron says:

    I’m told that communism was to die for in the PROC, the USSR, the DPRK, Cambodia, Vietnam, etc. And that socialism worked wonders for Venezuela and Argentina. I mean, if the millions of U.S. citizens risking their lives crossing shark-infested waters in leaky boats and inner tubes to reach the Utopian shores of Cuba isn’t sufficient to convince everyone that capitalism sucks, what will?

    Liked by 1 person

    • basenjibrian says:

      Ron: While not disagreeing with your basic point, plenty of people HAVE died for the glory of The Owners. The Slave Trade, for example, was a classic capitalist enterprise. I am sure the thousands who died due to Bhopal are less sanguine about the glories of multinational capitalism. I would be a little less smug about it.

      Liked by 1 person

      • makagutu says:

        Usually i am lost for words at some of the arguments Ron makes.

        Liked by 1 person

      • Ron says:

        Capitalism — “an economic system characterized by private or corporate ownership of capital goods, by investments that are determined by private decision, and by prices, production, and the distribution of goods that are determined mainly by competition in a free market” (Merriam-Webster) — is based on a voluntary exchange of goods and services between consenting individuals; which makes slavery impossible under capitalism.

        And industrial disasters can occur under any political system (see Chernobyl).

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        • basenjibrian says:

          Sure. But oppression and crimes against humanity can also occur under any political system. My point is they have. You are a hard core rightie. Your predecessors ilk justified slavery for generations (also for religious reasons….another supporting element to conservative “thought”) “Voluntary” doesn’t mean much in a world with such disparities in power and resources.

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          • Ron says:

            Crimes against humanity can only occur under authoritarian political systems — i.e., those that subvert the rights of the individual to the will of the collective or the ruling class or a dictator. In fact, Marxist doctrine called for a dictatorship of the proletariat.

            Moreover, capitalism is defined as an economic system — not a political system. That’s why Chinese government has adopted state capitalism as its economic model, yet continues to operate as a totalitarian state politically. (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/7932091.stm)

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  7. Barry says:

    I’m not convinced that a completely socialist society would be any better than a society where the legislature was replaced in its entirety with direct participatory democracy. Either way we’d end up with mediocrity and tyranny by the majority. There needs to be a system whereby the experts and the talented are allowed to influence decision-making is some way. What it is, I’m nor sure.

    Our present Prime Minister is quite open about the fact that capitalism, even the gentle form we have here, has not been kind to a large section of society, and this must change. Laissez-faire capatalism only seems to widen the margin between the haves and the have-nots. The eventual end result does not bear thinking about.

    In this country we seem to have a blend of democratic socialism and social democracy, and while we haven’t got the mix right yet (and perhaps never will), I think it’s worth our continuing experimentation.

    Liked by 2 people

    • makagutu says:

      Iโ€™m not convinced that a completely socialist society would be any better than a society where the legislature was replaced in its entirety with direct participatory democracy.

      I think I agree with you on this point.
      We need a system that combines the goods of capitalism and socialism- even anarchy- to build a more just world.

      Liked by 1 person

      • Barry says:

        This country’s done the full cycle from nationalising health and welfare services, education and major industries in the 1930s to wholesale privatisation of almost every public endeavour in the 1980s to mixture of public and private enterprise in almost every aspect of society. Can’t say it’s perfect, but when compared to the alternatives, I’ll take what we’ve got, even if it means we trip over every so often

        Liked by 2 people

  8. Swarn Gill says:

    I think ultimately the problem with capitalism is the way it puts profit above all else. As I think we’ve discussed before, money is a fiction. And in many ways it’s worse than religious fiction, because at least religion tries to address spiritual concerns we all have as humans. Money of course is also can be a resource, but it only becomes so when it used to purchase things we need, and so there is no doubt that there is some value in having a minimum amount of it, but to make it one’s life pursuit, to amass more of it, to have an entire society participate through investing in your company so they can make more money, and so then you make more money so they keep investing, and then you have to get strategic about marketing so everybody needs the thing you are selling, whether they really need it or now…it just sort of turns into this monster that ultimately amasses wealth for a very few people, as most of the people are just spending. What should be the value of owning a large company? A company which would produce nothing without its workers, no matter how talented and capable the originator might have been. You provide jobs, benefits, a quality product or service…there is a great deal of value to what the business owner puts into the world…but this is not enough in our world…one must also become ridiculously rich. Money and power changes the brain and I think there is a good deal of evidence that it has a corrupting influence on most people. I am not sure there is a way around that, other than building your society around values that actually lead to well-being. Beyond a certain minimum amount money correlates extremely poorly to well-being. I think we have to take that more seriously.

    Liked by 3 people

  9. dolphinwrite says:

    What has been lost to all too many citizens is the foundation of this country. All too many have not read the U.S. Constitution much less understand (Our liguistics is very sub-par.). They do not understand, much less have read, the development of our country from Europe. They don’t know history. They haven’t read the full account of the revolutionary war, what led to it, nor the words of Washington and those who endeavored to understand what makes the best society. As such, they hear theory without understanding. Cause and effects are not in their box, so to speak. All too often, emotions lead reasoning when reasoning should lead emotions.

    Liked by 2 people

    • makagutu says:

      The good news is that in almost every country, history is not properly taught.
      Reason, Hume argued, I think, is subject to the passions

      Like

      • dolphinwrite says:

        That’s the state of human beings. We are busy with our own lives, we do what we can, but unless there is a serious focus, history is lost over time. That’s where schools should have taken seriously this purpose. But again, time and other concerns take over.

        Liked by 1 person

        • makagutu says:

          Public education would have improved matters but then in so many places education is really horrible

          Like

          • dolphinwrite says:

            While I gained a decent education when America was #1 in the world, then went on to the university, 85% of my education came from my own efforts. Jobs, hobbies, reading, research, even still today. People need to understand they are in charge and responsible for their own learning. I can gain from others, but I fact check and think for myself. Thinking for yourselves, not brooding and reacting as many do, is key to any lifelong understanding. It’s ongoing.

            Liked by 1 person

            • makagutu says:

              In deed, education is an ongoing process

              Like

              • dolphinwrite says:

                Yes. Everything is an education. When my friends and I were dumpster diving for bike parts, supplies for tree houses, we were learning. We do need to learn our math, especially the basics to mastery, but we can also use it as when I ran a small business, at a teen, and had to calculate costs and profits. Also, talks with the children is good for parents. They learn more about each other. Every day is another learning opportunity.

                Liked by 1 person

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