29 thoughts on “I think this is an interesting article

  1. Eric Alagan says:

    Islam might overtake Christianity not only because of the fertility rate of the Muslims but also because of the precondition that comes with taking a Muslim spouse.

    A non-Muslim who marries a Muslim is expected (pressured by their society) to embrace the Islamic faith – at least, this is my experience with the Islamic societies in South East Asia.

    Arguably, such a stringent precondition does not exist in Christianity.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. renudepride says:

    I understand the precepts examined in the article. I also think that humanity no longer has the basic need for large families as the quality of life itself has supposedly improved. Naked hugs!

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    • makagutu says:

      You will be surprised. There are places where big families are the rule and not the exception

      Liked by 1 person

      • basenjibrian says:

        The main reason for big families is to take care of the father and mother as they age into senescence. Depending on “the State” to do so may be unsustainable over the long run, particularly in countries with declining populations (fewer kids to fund mom and dad). Not everyone will be able to “save” enough money for retirement.

        My mother’s long term care home costs $5,000 USD per month over her social security benefits.

        😦 .

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  3. Barry says:

    With Christian affiliation declining at a rate of about 10% every census (five yearly here in Aotearoa New Zealand), I don’t think it will have many adherents by 2050 (if any), at least in the form seen in the Americas and Africa. The 2018 census reported Christian affiliation at 36% and no affiliation at 48%. Keep in mind that affiliations such as humanism, agnosticism, atheism, socialism and a few more are counted as affiliations in the same manner as Christian denominations, Shintoism or Buhdism, and are not included in the no affiliation group.

    If this country is viewed as a model of a nation rapidly heading towards atheism or agnosticism, then I think that’s a mistake. Whether one calls it religious or spiritual, I see this country heading towards a situation where everyone has a “roll your own” or “mix and match” attitude to religion or non-religion, taking bits and pieces from a multitude of traditions and philosophies, where everyone’s own belief mix is seen as being valid for the person holding it, but not necessarily correct for anyone else.

    In other words, while organised religion is declining, and in NZ might be all but gone by 2050, I don’t see religiosity or spirituality going away any time soon. This is likely to be the trend wherever the population doesn’t suffer from strife, poverty or fear.

    Liked by 1 person

    • makagutu says:

      It’s unlikely, even in America, where the nones are increasing that spirituality will equally go down.
      So I think many places may turn out to be like NZ

      Liked by 2 people

      • Barry says:

        I find it incredible that in a nation such as the US, the prediction that Christianity (as it’s generally defined) is still likely to be held by 2 out of three people in 2050. What concerns me is that if current trends continue, it will be a less tolerant and more extreme form than currently exists there.

        Perhaps the high rate of religiosity is an indication that sectarianism, distrust, hate and fear are not likely to leave the American scene any time soon.

        Liked by 2 people

        • makagutu says:

          I think America represent a case of a very dysfunctional society brought about by race and manifested in economic inequalities. These differences will worsen in my view and religiosity will increase as a way of dealing with the social strife

          Liked by 2 people

        • maryplumbago says:

          Correct. America Christianity is much more politicized with great power among the republicans and also more based on fear and notions of white supremacy than in the rest of the developed world.

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  4. maryplumbago says:

    This is a very interesting article…somewhat makes sense ( to them) about the anti gay, abortion and birth control that they see as anti fertility in the race to maintain power.

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  5. basenjibrian says:

    We are all making an assumption here that strife, poverty, disease, will inevitably decline. Is this realistic? Climate change disruption is REAL. Peak oil is REAL (and cheap food that keeps us fat depends on oil!). Germs are becoming more resistant to antibiotics. And I see religion going out with a bang…look at how many people from (relatively) comfortable places who flocked to ISIS!

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  6. basenjibrian says:

    spawneedave: Late Stage Corrupt Crony and Disaster Capitalism is the state religion in the United States. Always has been. In Money We Trust.

    Or at least the only one that REALLY matters. Fundamentalist Christianity is just window dressing on the desires of the 1% to protect what they got.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Infidel753 says:

    The argument that religion will win out because of higher birth rates is not supported by data. In the US the non-religious percentage of the population has exploded over the last 20 years while Christianity is collapsing (the article says Christian affiliation in the US will fall to 66% by 2050, but in fact it has already fallen to 65%). Obviously this did not happen because of non-religious people out-breeding the religious. It’s mostly because of people who were raised religious abandoning religion. The same is true of the decline of religion in Europe.

    This will continue happening, and it is happening elsewhere. Surveys in the Arab world have shown about 22% of people self-identifying as non-religious, though for obvious reasons most keep quiet about it. There are similar declines in Latin America. Religious people will continue to have more children, but more and more of them will abandon religion as they grow up. Religion is in inexorable decline as societies become more developed and educated.

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    • makagutu says:

      Don’t you think the crises we are facing now: environmental, economic and political will have quite a number of people going back to religion?

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    • makagutu says:

      Africa is sending missionaries around the world. So there are still bastions for religion

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      • Infidel753 says:

        Well, they can send missionaries, but if the countries they are sending them to are becoming less religious due to improvements in education and economic development, those missionaries will not reverse the trend. Eventually Africa too will become more developed and religion will go into a decline there as well. It happened in Ireland, which once sent missionaries all over the world but where religion has practically collapsed in about one generation.

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        • makagutu says:

          It does look to me that even with progress, many people will still want to believe in chimeras. so that when we think religion is collapsing, it gets a new lease of life.

          Like

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