problem of evil: argument from traffic jam


It is a conclusion of this site that the problem of evil remains unresolved for classical theism.

I found this view of the problem quite hilarious.

About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

53 thoughts on “problem of evil: argument from traffic jam

  1. judyt54 says:

    basically this is either a stupid oik, or pretends to be. He knows he’s gonna be in a traffic snarl, every day, so he should be prepared. He has a car, he has a media player other than the radio (most cars do, these days) and if he’s so annoyed by the local stations, load up some music and listen to that instead of whining.

    this: ” My special problem is that I am unprepared when my 12-minute commute turns into 25 minutes. I’ve got nothing. Three quasi-classic rock stations that play the same 100 songs. A person can only take so much of Bruce Springsteen’s “Glory Days.” ”

    He lost my vote (not that he ever had one) right there.

    Liked by 3 people

    • makagutu says:

      His point is that traffic snarl is a mess that has no redeeming feature like a toothache.

      Liked by 2 people

      • judyt54 says:

        I just can’t find the analogy to evil in all of that. And often, evil is in the eye of the beholder, and a very slippery slope to deal with. Evil is what you say it is, from skirts that are too short to axe murderers.

        Liked by 2 people

        • basenjibrian says:

          I don’t see the analogy between a traffic jam and evil, either. Traffic jams are in fact the result of TOO MUCH GOOD. The money to own and operate private automobiles, the choice to live an autosexual lifestyle that mandates long commutes so one can live in a faux-rural suburban setting like the other members of the “gentry”. It’s a problem caused by too much.

          Traffic jams have been a reality of urban areas for millennia. Ancient Roman nabobs wrote witty complaints around the turn of the millennium!

          Liked by 1 person

          • makagutu says:

            Traffic jams continue to exit because of man’s failure in planning among others.
            I think for the theologian, the point is that just like we suffer and see no reason to it, traffic jam too has no redeeming value.

            Liked by 1 person

            • basenjibrian says:

              After decades in the field, I am more skeptical than you, Maka. There is only so much “planning” can do. Human beings and human economies are too complicated and too contradictory for planning to solve things miraculously 🙂 I stand by my original comment: the wealth that permits widespread use of private automobiles, along with the preference for such, the vast marketing machine, and the movement towards suburbia all help create traffic jams. There is never enough money for enough freeways, and all the new freeway lanes do is induce more demand for ever more distant commuting. Broadacre City!

              Like

              • makagutu says:

                the private automobile brought hell to cities and engineers think by making roads wider, they will solve the problem. They behave like a fat person who instead of cutting weight buys a size bigger every time and feels good about it and shortly after has to buy another size bigger

                Like

  2. jeremiahmyer says:

    The comments were even better than the article. “If Heavy Traffic Makes You Question God’s Existence, You’re Not Alone” And who or what caused the heavy traffic? according to one commenter it was the liberals because they didn’t want to build roads in the country. That jem got 31 upvotes. laughable.

    Liked by 3 people

  3. john zande says:

    Light traffic and great parking spaces make me think of Jesus.

    (That guy teaches???)

    Liked by 1 person

  4. renudepride says:

    I agree with your assessment of the linked article’s humor. However, the author, as a seminary professor, knows his daily schedule and can plan his commute accordingly. Perhaps his deity hasn’t relayed that inspiration to him yet. Good post, my Kenyan brother! 🙂 Naked hugs!

    Like

  5. jim- says:

    The comments certainly offer little hope to humanity. The backasswards blame game is truly incredible. If there is a god, he is an idiot. If you can see the hand of the creator by observing his ultimate creation… we’re fucked.

    Liked by 1 person

  6. Nan says:

    He sure took up a lot of space to say traffic is horrible. And to try to relate it to something spiritual? He needs to stick to his day job.

    Liked by 1 person

    • makagutu says:

      His day job is teaching theology. I am not sure he will do any better.

      Liked by 2 people

    • judyt54 says:

      not only did he manage to say traffic was horrible, it was somehow implied (or stated, my memory forbids me to go back and read it) that it was Our Fault. The non-believers, the sinners, the wastrels, who caused the traffic snarl in the first place.

      Liked by 2 people

      • makagutu says:

        Heathens causing traffic snarl ups every where

        Like

      • basenjibrian says:

        But since the almighty GAWD was responsible for creating us heathens, and because every single thing is according to his sacred and detailed Ineffable Plan:

        1. We are Gawd’s special children too.
        2. The Traffic Jam is God’s fault, because everything is ultimately God’s fault.

        Like

        • makagutu says:

          in a world where god is omnibenevolent, traffic jam is its problem

          Like

          • basenjibrian says:

            By definition, a traffic jam caused by God cannot be a “problem”. The traffic jam, just like the tsunami that killed 100,000 heathens, is all part of His ineffable Plan. As a member of The Chosen People (White American), I do not suffer from Tsunamis because I am beloved of the Lawd! By definition! /sarc

            (Ewwwwww. Even pretending to be a Calvinist makes me feel a little dirty).

            Like

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