Is the cure more deadly than the disease?


That seems to be the opinion of this author and this group which then leads me to ask why are we all doing this? Is it a case of global hysteria? Or a global propaganda war?

There are already 63K deaths worldwide as at the time of publishing from a variety of causes. Hidden in that number is 111K deaths this year arising from seasonal flu.

And with that I go to ride my bicycle.

About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

67 thoughts on “Is the cure more deadly than the disease?

  1. Tish Farrell says:

    One bizarre aspect of this is that governments and so called charitable foundations have been acting out pandemic scenarios over the past decade, plotting out all the outcomes. Last October in New York, Johns Hopkins and the Gates Foundation acted out a corona pandemic in Event 201 – you can see them in action on YouTube. Also further insights at ‘Medical Martial Law 2020’ on The Corbett Report on YouTube.

    In the UK we are now in ‘lockdown’. The problem with this is people do get sick and die from fear. They may think they have Covid-19 when they have flu, which can indeed be fatal for the elderly and chronically sick. Rather than endless scare stories (BBC as bad as any) I think people need sensible advice on how to keep themselves and near ones well and maintain good spirits. In fact Boris, (in fake Churchill mode) is telling us we need to isolate ourselves in order to save the NHS. And that actually may be at the heart of matter: it’s been run-down for years, and was already in a parlous state last year; staff and facilities run ragged and understaffed long before corona.

    So out on your bike, hopefully in some sun, sounds a very excellent notion, Mak. At least I am allowed by Michael Gove to go to my allotment. Take care!

    Liked by 1 person

  2. jim- says:

    Part of what is wrong with the world is humans constantly try to fix problemsโ€”yet somehow that shortsightedness always make it worse. The cure is usually going to have longer lasting effects than the problem at hand.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. Good question. As of now, the “cure” is scaring me more than the problem BUT, wadda I know, eh?! It is an interesting conversation to have. Now, I’m off to offer my thoughts and prayers that the god who gave us said virus now keeps us safe from it. $Amen$ ๐Ÿ˜€

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  4. Ron says:

    Excellent suggestion, Mak. Every day is a good day to ride.

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  5. Cure? Hardly. What we can talk about is minimising damage/harm.
    So one calculation, for example, is whether we want a 500 worker factory to close for isolation/quarantine – in which case X amount of money will be lost. Or do we keep it going, expose workers to the disease thereby losing productivity, risk a disease related shutdown and the deaths of a certain number of workers? Is death the line? Would keeping the factory open not result in similar losses in the long run?
    Let’s play scruples, which side are you on?

    Liked by 4 people

    • Ron says:

      Too late. The harm could have been minimized entirely by closing borders and screening returning vacationers for illness when the first reports from China came out late last year.

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      • That would have required a non-globalised world. In the modern world containment is much more complex. Particularly because it takes a certain amount of time to even realise we’re looking at a “new” disease.

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        • makagutu says:

          I think new contagious diseases expose the soft underbelly of globalization. Without air & sea travel, this disease may have been limited to a few people in some Chinese town we wouldn’t even have known but then I wouldn’t be chatting with Pink.

          Liked by 1 person

          • The virus itself is actually Chinese. One of them opened a FABULOUS Chinese restaurant right around the corner from me. Great food, but all the wait staff there are viruses, too, so they are VERY, VERY tiny and it’s damned hard for them to carry the HUGE plates filled with people’s orders around from table to table. Oh, also, if you happen to inhale one of these waiters, you might get sick. BUT, all this aside, they serve good food. Can’t wait for the crisis to end so I can go back to the restaurant. Oh, I just thought of something! If the virus is wiped out, the place will have no more wait staff!!! First world problems, eh.

            Liked by 1 person

        • Ron says:

          I’m not sure I follow? As late as 24 February 2020 the WHO advised against the application of any unnecessary restrictions on international traffic. IOW, the world’s top health watchdog dropped the ball.

          Meanwhile Russia (pop. ~143 million), which ignored that advice and closed it’s borders at the end of January currently reports under 500 confirmed cases of infection, while Italy (pop. ~60 million) reports over 59.000 cases. Given that the majority of confirmed cases were travelers enter via air and boats, it only makes sense to monitor and control those points of entry first.

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          • We know the virus was circulating from at the very least November of last year. When was the last time we could trust the numbers being given by Russia? Or China for that matter? “500” confirmed cases is a rather meaningless concept. That’s what NY had when testing began, and then it skyrocketed.

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            • makagutu says:

              There are three places I doubt their numbers; Russia, China and Iran.

              Liked by 1 person

            • Ron says:

              Even if we increase the Russian numbers a hundredfold it still comes to less than half that of Italy for twice the population. Given that this affects primarily the elderly and the already unhealthy, the correct course of action would be to advise those segments of the population to self-isolate until the virus has run its course in the general population.

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              • makagutu says:

                The old. Those with pre-existing conditions are especially at risk so they should be isolated. The rest of the people should just keep going. Maybe the virus will just give up

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                • Ron says:

                  That’s what I’m saying. The majority will either remain unaffected or get sick and recover — just like every other flu virus.

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                  • makagutu says:

                    There are reports those who recover suffer lung damage so again no one wants to catch it

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                  • Barry says:

                    The problem is that the hospitalisation rate for COVID-19 is much higher than for normal flu. When medical resources get overloaded as in Italy, they start rationing it. When oxygen and ventilators are rationed, it’s usually the oldest patients who are last in the queue, so the death rate for the elderly is higher than it would be with unlimited medical resources. That’s the whole purpose of the lockdown – at least that’s what it is in NZ. The lockdown flattens the curve so that hopefully the health system does not get overwhelmed, and everyone who needs it can get adequate care.

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              • Russia admits to having 36000 people in observation as possible cases. How does that look in the grand scheme of things? Hardly like their numbers are anywhere near as low as they claim. Successive Russian governments have made deception an art form. Chernobyl? The AIDS crisis? The invasion of Ukraine?

                Are you proposing the herd immunity theory that results in massive numbers of deaths? It’s nonsense. Younger people have a lower mortality rate but the disease still causes enormous damage with a good +45% of people on ventilators being of working age (according to the Spanish numbers.)

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                • Ron says:

                  No, I’m saying that a thorough medical examination of all inbound visitors (and especially those arriving from China) would have nipped this in the bud. But now it’s too late to contain the virus and it will have to run its course.

                  As for Russia: under observation does not necessarily translate to confirmed cases, because anyone feeling the mildest symptoms of illness will report to a hospital in fear of having contracted the virus. And I think it’s a mistake to think that the Kremlin has cornered the market on government deception, because the leaders of “free world” governments are often just as guilty of disseminating false information, as we are slowly beginning to find out from documents released following freedom of information requests. But that’s a whole other topic.

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                  • Your comments give the impression you spend a whole lot of time on alt-right/conspiracy sites. Your ability to sort the probability of veracity of evidence doesn’t seem very sharp.
                    Have you asked yourself why you engage people online to affirm/confirm some of these ideas? You don’t seem genuinely interested in topics other than for confirmation purposes. What are you hoping to prove? To yourself? To other people? Is it to create a sense of belonging to a group?

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                    • Ron says:

                      Your entire comment was little more than an ad hom, so we’ll continue the conversation when you’re ready to engage the points I raised.

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                    • My comment was a question (or series of questions), not an attack. I’ve seen you argue, I think it was with Tildeb, that feminism is an ill of identity politics. Interestingly missing that feminism is a demand to end the identity politics that has excluded females from rights for much of history.
                      Is it a mere coincidence your comments all align with alt-right/incel ideologies?

                      Liked by 1 person

                  • Barry says:

                    One difficulty is that it appears many people are asymptomatic. The only way of preventing it from crossing borders would have been to quarantine everyone in rigidly enforced isolation camps until a test was confirmed negative. This country required everyone arriving in the country to self isolate for two weeks. Didn’t work as too many people flouted the regulation.

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                    • makagutu says:

                      Here, too, many people flouted the regulation for self quarantine and went on with their lives as if no regulation had been given. All arriving persons must now be quarantined at govt appointed facilities

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                    • Barry says:

                      Spot checks here, revealed that Kiwis did self isolate. Unfortunately the same couldn’t be said of tourists. And this country has a lot of tourists even though the borders have been closed for some time. Being at the end of the world and relatively expense to get here, tourists tend to stay longer than at other destinations.

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                    • makagutu says:

                      Here, neither tourists nor locals bothered to self-isolate and now the govt is trying to trace all the people they have come into contact with

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                    • basenjibrian says:

                      The Swiss Propaganda site (has to be a Russian-funded group??) claims that the virus tests are not vetted and give lots of false positives. I’m not sure your solution is that workable.

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                    • makagutu says:

                      It would be interesting to know who funds them

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                    • Ron says:

                      There are rapid tests that yield results in under half an hour. On the plus side, they yield very low false positives. On the minus side, they also yield higher false negatives. Nonetheless, I still its better than nothing at all because at least you weed out those who test positive.

                      Liked by 1 person

            • basenjibrian says:

              Especially as pointed out in Maka’sโ€ฆ.interesting…link (read it if you have not) we don’t even really know what the numbers are. A lot of false positives/misdiagnosed. And a lot of people already sick passing on.

              Liked by 1 person

          • Barry says:

            But they have had a massive spike in pneumonia cases this year. What’s the betting that a large percentage of that is COVID-19? Besides, Russia, like the USSR before it, isn’t renown for accurate reporting.

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            • basenjibrian says:

              Or there is a spike in Pneumonia that is being reported as or assumed to be Covid 19.

              Like the undiagnosed late stage leukemia patient (21 years old) who we are breathlessly told “died of Covid”

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      • makagutu says:

        This pandemic has made a joke of borders. Now countries are rushing to ban international flights to prevent importing the virus when it’s already home.

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    • makagutu says:

      Or we keep the factory running in shifts of X number persons, lose a bit of productivity & make recovery possible in a much shorter time than is the present case.
      Well with cure I meant management of the problem.

      Liked by 1 person

  6. Barry says:

    Is the cure more deadly than the disease? I don’t believe so. About all the lockdowns/shutdowns can do if enacted early enough is to flatten the curve – reduce the rate if infections to a level where it doesn’t overwhelm the the health system. South Korea seems to have gotten it about right. NZ went into lockdown before evidence of community spread became evident. Until 2 days ago, the authorities here were still able to trace all infections to an overseas source. Even so, the infection rate here has been doubling every 4 days.

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    • makagutu says:

      I think we are having almost the same situation here.
      The effects of the lock down is not going to be good here. Other economies like yours may recover much sooner

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      • Barry says:

        We’ll be more affected than other OECD countries due to our reliance on tourism and education for foreign exchange – over 20%. It’s effectively wiped out, possibly for good.

        Our other major earners are primary products, and we’ve already seen big drops – especially timber. We’ve run out of room to stockpile logs for export for example.

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        • makagutu says:

          Tea, tourism, diaspora remittances, flowers have all suffered here. And worse we are a major importer of goods so things are not looking pretty this side of the ocean

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          • Barry says:

            Much the same here. Apart from some high value apparel, very little is manufactured in this country. Just a week ago the wife and I paid deposits of almost NZ$30,000 for some major renovations at our home. We’ve since discovered every item apart from wall and floor linings is imported. Now we’ve been informed that some products may take up to 16 weeks to arrive, and everything is on hold. Even the application for a building permit as the district council has closed its offices for the duration of the lockdown. Who knows if any of the businesses we’ve just paid will be still in existence when this is all over.

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            • makagutu says:

              That does sound much like here.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Barry says:

                I guess our biggest difference is that in Kenya nearly 60% of the population works in agriculture, whereas here it is a fraction over 5%. On the other hand 75% of Kiwis work in the service sector versus 35% in Kenya.

                But as a percentage of GDP, exports in Kenya are 13% – about the same percentage as the USA – but ours is 38%. Prediction are that we’ll be hit worse than other OECD nations and may end up with an economy and standard of living similar to developing nations. It really does depend on how this disaster plays out and whether or not international trade picks up where it left off.

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