Random post


As death toll soars, race, economic, gender, political and other divides in America are laid bare. Our friends in the US of A can tell us what they make of this link.

What is the ideal age to introduce children to religion without exposing them to the risk of brainwashing? The answer is

[..]the old advice that tells us that politics, sex and spirituality are best kept private

 

About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

47 thoughts on “Random post

  1. Ubi Dubium says:

    The ideal age? Kids can be introduced to ideas about religion that other people have, with no fear of brainwashing, as soon as they are old enough for parents to read them books. I made sure my kids had a solid grounding in Greek Mythology very early on. And then later, we made sure they had small supervised doses of exposure to other people’s religions, with conversations about it afterwards. Eventually they were going to get the full blast or Fundamentalism thrown at them by schoolmates, or extended family members, and we needed to make sure that they were able to recognize it for what it was, and to put it in context.

    And this approach worked like a vaccine. Both my kids are atheists now, without our ever having to tell them that they should be atheists. They have thanked me for raising them without indoctrination, and I think they are pretty safe from falling for anything of the sort as adults.

    Liked by 4 people

  2. keithnoback says:

    What’s to say? The article has it right.
    When they ask about it, is the right time. Animals and small children can smell fear at work, so there is no lower age limit to the “what is religion?” discussion.

    Like

  3. Ron says:

    “It is true that diabetes, hypertension, obesity and other underlying health conditions are prevalent in many black communities. But focusing on these co-morbidities is tantamount to victim-blaming.”

    Translation: It’s not your fault that your poor lifestyle choices turned you into a fat sack of shit that succumbs easily to illness. It’s the fault of those wascist white people. Because reasons.

    Like

    • makagutu says:

      So there are no structural reasons such cases are prevalent in these neighbourhoods? The rest of America is eating healthy except black and Latinos?

      Like

      • Ron says:

        No. Unhealthy whites are also affected. So crying ‘racism’ is a cop-out for lack of individual responsibility.

        Like

        • basenjibrian says:

          In the world of Libertoonia, people are bold individuals, fortresses of unassailable selfness that are utterly independent of family, social class, community, nation, and historical period. All Men Are Islands, contra the common meme.

          Ron: You understand why those of us who have not drank deep of the poisoned springs of Rothbard and the Austrian School and their ilk consider libertarianism a religion worthy only of antisocial 14 year olds, don’t you?

          There are cultural and economic reasons why “junk food” is prevalent in certain socioeconomic groups. Poor education. Lack of good, affordable grocery stores. The sheer exhaustion of working a “bad job” that makes it easier and necessary to simply give in and stop at McDonalds. Neighborhoods that are dangerous and not conducive to an evening run. But let us not forget the American government encourages and SUBSIDIZES bad food. Corn syrup is subsidized. Ever changing dietary advice in the media (no fat. no carbs. vegan. carnivore) And, it is too easy to dismiss the reality that addictions rewire our brains. It is not as simple as “Just Say No” if you are addicted to something. So moral scolds like Ron the Bold Freedom Warrior are less than useless on these matters.

          But yes, we are not mere victims. We still make choices. I am not one to go to the other extreme, either (the Social Justice Warrior group identity School of Eternal Victims). That way leads to its own paralysis. And the nastier groups on the racist identity white are happily adopting and adapting the same “group victim” ideologies for their own pernicious ends.

          Whew. That was a screed. Take it for what its worth. Ron, you inspire me.

          Like

          • Ron says:

            Are you sure you are replying to the correct person? Because I can’t recall mentioning Rothbard or the Austrian School or libertarianism in any of my comments — ever!

            What I have stated on many occasions, however, is that individuals possess the moral right to live their lives as they please so long as it does not impinge upon the rights of others to do likewise. Consequently, it follows that you must also accept full acountability for the outcomes of your own actions, because blaming others for your mistakes is just poor form. And claiming those mistakes are attributable to people of a different skin color — as the author of the above-linked article attempts to do — is just out-and-out racist.

            As to the excuses presented:

            “Argue for your limitations, and sure enough they’re yours.”–Richard Bach

            Like

            • basenjibrian says:

              They are not “excuses”. They are explanations (partial). And I never denied agency. Rothbard and the Austrian School were never mentioned b y you, of course, but they tend to be the sacred texts and high priest of many hard core libertarians. Heck, you may not even be that far gone, but the moralizing makes it seem at least a possibility.

              You, of course, are happy to serve your role as a moral scold. It’s not real becoming when the religious do it, so why adopt that role for yourself? “The poors deserve to die because they eat too much pizza” is little different than “all those sinners are being punished by Gawd with AIDS or Hurricanes or earthquakes.”

              Liked by 1 person

              • Ron says:

                Of course they’re excuses; and pandering to those excuses most certainly robs individuals of their of personal agency. What I see is a poverty of motivation rather than a poverty of opportunity. Because where there’s a will, there’s usually a way. Gaps in education can be filled by going to the library and taking free courses on the Internet. Lack of affordable produce can be remedied by buying seeds and growing your own vegetables on a porch, balcony or windowsill — or by starting a community garden if lack of personal growing space is really an issue. (And info on how to grow and prepare you’re own food is also available online or at the library.) If you live in a dangerous neighborhood then moving to a better neighborhood is recommended. And if that’s not possible, band together with your neighbors to reclaim it. The instructions for going about that are also available for free online and elsewhere. Addiction help is only a phone call away.

                So far from being a moral scold, I’m doing the exact opposite: I’m telling others to take charge of their lives and become the person you want to be. All it requires is a genuine desire to do what it takes to improve your station in life. Because if you’re not willing to put in the effort, what make you think others will take up the slack?

                Like

                • basenjibrian says:

                  Damn Ron. Your proud ignorance is awe inspiring! “Move to a safer neighborhood” as if it is that easy. You are familiar with the history of segregation in the United States, aren’t you? If the bold striver moved to a “safer neighborhood” he or she would likely be met with a firebomb or a burning cross.

                  Liked by 1 person

                • makagutu says:

                  What I see is a poverty of motivation rather than a poverty of opportunity. Because where there’s a will, there’s usually a way. Gaps in education can be filled by going to the library and taking free courses on the Internet. Lack of affordable produce can be remedied by buying seeds and growing your own vegetables on a porch, balcony or windowsill — or by starting a community garden if lack of personal growing space is really an issue. (And info on how to grow and prepare you’re own food is also available online or at the library.)

                  Where I come from, even community libraries are rare. And there are many instances of poverty of opportunity. And while an argument can be made for will, in many cases when opportunities are scarce, even the most willed individual ends up working like a donkey and getting only paid in whiplashes

                  Like

                  • Ron says:

                    Ok. Now you’ve shifted the goalposts from North America to Kenya.

                    Nonetheless, according to the following article, Kenya has the highest Internet (83%) and mobile phone (91%) access in Africa.

                    https://businesstoday.co.ke/kenya-leads-africa-smartphone-usage

                    Which means Kenyans also have access to all the online libraries and learning resources found on the Internet.

                    So there’s plenty of opportunity to move forward for those who possess the desire to do so.

                    Like

            • makagutu says:

              In one class that I had in graduate school about poverty, one of the difficulties is definitional and then approaches. This quote

              “Argue for your limitations, and sure enough they’re yours.”–Richard Bach

              is right there in the approaches. You are poor because you want to be poor.

              Like

              • Ron says:

                That’s not at all what it means. It means your limitations are self-imposed. In short, seeking out reasons to justify your lack of success will sabotage your efforts towards achieving success.

                Like

                • Nan says:

                  For some, I don’t think they need to “seek out reasons.” The facts/reasons are right there in front of them. When you take a walk in the woods and start coming across fallen trees and branches, do you tell yourself they were placed there just to keep you from advancing?

                  Like

                  • Ron says:

                    You’re still missing the point. It’s about attitude, not circumstances. The pessimist views all problems as insurmountable obstacles, whereas the optimist views them as a challenge to be overcome or even a hidden opportunity. Those fallen trees blocking you path can be used for firewood and building materials — or sold to others for such.

                    Like

                    • Nan says:

                      I’m sorry, Ron, but you remind me so much of others who think it’s all because someone just didn’t “try hard enough” to improve their lot in life. When you don’t have and can’t afford to get the tools, you CAN’t make “firewood and building materials.”

                      What’s that old saying about walking a mile in someone else’s shoes?

                      Liked by 1 person

                    • Ron says:

                      Your response illustrates my point. The pessimist cries out, “I have no tools or money!” and gives up. The optimist asks, “How can I acquire the tools (or labor) needed to transform these trees into a marketable product?” and then seeks out a solution.

                      Like

                    • Nan says:

                      I agree with your perspective on pessimists and optimists. But to me, this is not the point when discussing individuals who live and die in poverty. But then, you’re not the first person who looks at them this way. And it’s unfortunate because it places a burden on them that they don’t deserve.

                      Since we’re on different sides of the fence — and I don’t see either of us climbing over — let’s agree our discussion is over. Have a great week and stay safe.

                      Like

          • makagutu says:

            Ron, you inspire me.

            That’s two of us

            Like

        • makagutu says:

          so to be poor and find oneself in ghettos in the land of “milk and honey” is a lack of individual responsibility

          Like

          • Ron says:

            How did those ghettos become ghettos? When a once-affluent neighborhood slowly becomes drug-infested, gang-ridden slum, is that the fault of the previous residents or the current ones?

            Like

            • basenjibrian says:

              This is a breathtaking lack of historical perspective, Ron. Why are you wasting time here? Isn’t there a single mother sweeping the floors in a 7-11 you can berate?

              Like

              • basenjibrian says:

                Off topic semi/off-topic: I will say, channeling The Thing in the White House and Ron, I am not sure how setting random (unlucky) strangers’ cars on fire and young white “professional rioters” looting an outlet mall 45 miles away from the City of San Francisco “changes the system” or “protests police violence:” very effectively.

                Like

                • makagutu says:

                  Yeah.
                  I am unsure whether that earns anyone support.

                  Like

                  • Ya know what works? Gas chambers ‘n crematoriums! They work for 1.) rioters-fuckin’ bastard; 2.) Da lazy poor who didn’t plan ahead–wastes o’life; 3.) the disabled who drain the economy with their god damned whining and fake-ass bullshit–kill ’em all; 4.) libtards, of course, and finally, 5.) any so-called fake-ass “conservative’ or “libertarian” who is not a devout, loving Christian or who fails to come up with a FinalSolution as good as mine for the real problems facing America and the world today–lazy fuckin’ poor bastards and the sick ‘n weak.

                    Vote for me in November and the pussy-talkers on the right will finally see what TrueConservatism is: Me. Thanks, and may Our Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ, keep you and bless you. $Amen$

                    Like

              • Ron says:

                Let me know when you’re ready to formulate a coherent argument.

                Pro-tip: Ad homs are not coherent arguments.

                Like

                • basenjibrian says:

                  It’s not an “Ad Hom”. It’s an astonished observation about many of your profoundly blind opinions. I would respond that very few of your arguments themselves are “rational arguments” in any way, shape, or form. My favorite has to be “why don’t those lazy poors just move to a nice neighborhood!?”

                  I am going to copy n argument upthread and just shake my hed and say “we will never agree here, so why continue?”

                  Liked by 1 person

                  • Ron says:

                    Once again I’m prompted to ask, “Are you are responding to the correct person? Because I never wrote the words you quoted; so you’re flailing at a straw man.

                    Like

            • makagutu says:

              Hahaha, Ron. Some areas started out as slums. You must have heard of such places I imagine? Or maybe they don’t exist in the US of A.

              Like

              • Ron says:

                Perhaps some started out as slums. But the majority of the current slums across North America all started at as functional neighborhoods with functional buildings and functional infrastructure.

                Like

  4. People who have diabetes and are overweight are lazy and weak, and need to be gassed then immediately cremated. I’m tired of whining liberals going on and on about bullshit like “racism”, “poverty” and other such garbage. I fucking HATE liberals! Total wastes of life. People who are fat, lazy, sick, and impoverished are a god-damned stain on Christian America and need to gotten rid of with my perfect, final solution. The lazy fuckers make me sick, as do these so-called “conservatives” who whine and bitch online about these people yet stay quiet about what they damn well know, deep down in their bones, needs to be done about them. Such “conservatives” sicken me even more than the fat, lazy, sick maggot-like people they claim bother them. Vote for me in November, and I promise to put a permanent end to such crap. $Amen$
    Yours in The All-Loving Arms of Jesus Christ, The Arm Chair Pontificator.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. shelldigger says:

    The answer is, do not lie to your children. Except for Santa and the Easter bunny (there is a certain magic that kids should share when they are young.) But those lies need to be nipped in the bud by age 10 or sooner, if the question comes up. (and it will sooner or later.)

    I have had a hand in raising 5 kids. Out of 5 kids, 4 are atheist. One is religious, with the caveat she has mental problems. I don’t just have a blog Evidence Based Reality, I live it. When the questions come, and boy they will, be honest. Try to be fair and indifferent. But honesty is always the best policy.

    Like Ubi, I did not smack the kids over the head with atheism, I just grounded them in reality, answered the questions as best I could, and with as much facts/data to back it up I could find if that was necessary. They became atheists on their own. As we all know, religion propagates on lies and bullshit. Honesty is the antimatter to religious untruths.

    Liked by 2 people

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