Thoughts that keep me awake


The landmass that makes the African continent is larger than China, Europe and America combined. The population of Africa is a measly 1.1 billion. India is 1.3 billion and China 1.4 billion but we have a population problem in Africa. What am I missing?

Do watchmakers believe that there is some absolute time that they try to make their chronographs match with accuracy?

Is there wisdom in dying for truth in a world where there is no absolute truth? Especially in the field of convictions? Should not one make allowance for being wrong? Or mistaken?

Those who kill others for the truth, do they allow for being wrong? How can they make amends if they were to discover they were grossly mistaken?

How is that African dictators never seem to die or even fall sick in office? Their hold both on power and health makes one think they have a deal with fortune to cause as much pain as possible and then some more? Well, maybe all dictators/ authoritarian leaders.

Why is running addictive and sometimes so hard?

About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

39 thoughts on “Thoughts that keep me awake

  1. Mordanicus says:

    In regard of your first question: the Sahara is a big chunk of Africa and hardly hospitable to humans.

    Liked by 2 people

  2. Here’s another question. Why isn’t Islam the only religion on earth cause right in the Quran it says, “This book is not to be doubted”? What, can’t people read? Duh! How much more evidence can people need!

    Liked by 2 people

  3. keithnoback says:

    We don’t have a population problem, but a lifestyle problem which spans the globe.
    Hatefulness is invigorating (and also its own punishment).
    Time is an illusion.
    All worthwhile activities are compelling, and so, hard.
    Sweet dreams. ๐Ÿ™‚

    Like

    • makagutu says:

      Sleep well, Keith.
      If one were put in a room where the lighting is constant, would they tell the passage of time?

      Like

      • keithnoback says:

        The suprachiasmatic nucleus keeps on ticking, even in a cave.

        Like

        • Barry says:

          The problem is that it needs daylight (or suitable artificial light) to remain synchronised with Earth’s rotation. Your circadian rhythm will drift over time otherwise. And then there’s some people such as myself where the synchronisation doesn’t occur. I have a “natural” circadian rhythm of slightly over 25 hours and even with plenty of exposure to daylight it doesn’t change. If left to my own devices I feel much better when I get up and go to bed an hour later than the previous day. Unfortunately it drives everyone else bonkers as I’m only in sync with them once every 3 or 4 weeks – I tried it for a month many years ago and the fallout from friends and family wasn’t worth it.

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        • makagutu says:

          that it does. whether one will tell that an hour or 3 hours have since passed is what i am not certain of

          Like

  4. renudepride says:

    Well, another posting of thoughts to ponder…and ponder…and ponder! Okay, I’m out of practice! A change is coming our way…we got rid of the major headache! ๐Ÿ™‚

    Liked by 1 person

  5. basenjibrian says:

    I would argue that India and China have HORRIFIC population problems. Far worse than Africa Look at the horrific problems of pollution of groundwater in China and the choking smog afflicting the Delhi region.

    I would also argue that it is both a population problem and a lifestyle problem. But industrial civilization created the circumstances that allowed the population to boom. Without industrial civilization, the population will collapse. I have done my part (nobody in my family has produced mini-mes/sprogs) ๐Ÿ™‚

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    • makagutu says:

      I think it is a political problem in how we use and distribute resources.
      In most African cities, we have serious pollution problems especially from poorly disposed solid waste that threatens underground water aquifers

      Like

  6. Barry says:

    (1) What are you missing? Polluted skies and waterways for one. China and India are good examples. And while the skies in Aotearoa are mostly pollution free, the same can not be said of our waterways. They are suffering from the consequences of more than a century of intensive agriculture and horticulture, and getting worse.

    (2) Yes.TAI

    (3) (a) That’s a personal decision. (b) Always

    (4) (a) Most don’t. If they did, they wouldn’t kill. (b) They can’t.

    (5) That’s the way the cookie crumbles world wide. No idea why.

    (6) Addictive? Really? Not experienced that.

    Like

    • makagutu says:

      6. yes, very. I always want to go for a run. Only don’t do it to make muscle recovery possible
      2. I see.
      4. I like your answers
      5. Crazy isn’t it? Museveni our neighbour has been president for 35 years and just won another term. Kagame has been president since 94 and i am almost certain will be in the next ballot.

      Liked by 1 person

  7. Ark says:

    Why is running addictive and sometimes so hard

    It’s the continual serotonin fix.
    I went from a 4km fun run , just as a bet to almost weekly marathons, half marathons, everything in between and eventually 3 Comrades (90km).

    The hard part is knowing when to stop!

    Like

    • makagutu says:

      I think as long as you manage to stay accident free, the other side of the grave should be the limit ๐Ÿ˜€

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ark says:

        I had the usual runners problems, mostly brought about by overuse.

        This past year I’ve tended to walk rather than run, usually with the dog.

        Like

        • makagutu says:

          I have managed to avoid overuse by research but I had a torn calf muscle towards the end of the year that I took a break for it to heal. Now I am back and trying to train for a half marathon.

          Liked by 1 person

          • Ark says:

            21s were my favourite distance – not too short and not too long to be physically debilitating.

            Overuse is usually because of being over enthusiastic.
            Less is more.
            Fartlek helps as does hill-training.
            All good stuff. I’m sure you’ll do well. Long as it’s fun, then half the battle is over.

            Like

            • makagutu says:

              I am doing shorter training runs at the moment while increasing distance. I rest on alternate days.
              I will be doing stride repeats and hill reps though all my runs have hills.
              I am enjoying it at the moment. Maybe I should get a running club

              Like

              • Ark says:

                Hill reps for me usually involved a medium warm up jog – couple of kms then jog down hill turn around and sprint up flat-out. Wait until my heart rate returned to ‘normal’ then repeat – jog down sprint up, focussing on the top of the hill, so as to keep my torso more upright, thus allowing to work the arms and a higher and easier leg lift.
                Number of reps depended on my fitness and the size of the hill, then I would jog home as a cool down. Collapsing with a cold beer afterwards was optional.
                ๐Ÿ™‚

                A club is a fun option. Certainly gives you people you know to run with during races, if that’s your thing?

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                • makagutu says:

                  I don’t think I do well with club activities though. I prefer solo activities where I change direction, pace and duration without a thought.

                  My hill reps are usually almost similar. Find an incline, struggle up as fast as I can then go down at an easy pace. Do it many times. Then go home.

                  Liked by 2 people

                  • Ark says:

                    My running was similar – prefer solo or with one mate. He now lives in Cyprus. We joined a club because one had to in those days to get a license and to run marathons.

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                    • basenjibrian says:

                      I try to pace my cycling by rotating between riding and weight lifting. Tuesday and Wednesday were weight lifting days, for example. I am not nearly as obsessive as I am on the bike, but I still try to be consistent. There is one gym that moved all of its equipment out doors. It rigorously enforces masking, and everyone wipes off the equipment (although that is not the primary means of transmission). It is a risk, but I am willing to take it. And I try to get in and out very quickly-under an hour every time.

                      I went nuts when I could not lift, even in my half ass style. (I cannot understand people who are so obsessed that they inject toxic hormones. Or, for some reason Indians males seem prone to a form of body dysmorphia that leds them to inject oil into the arms to make their biceps look bigger! Check out OE Fitness on YouTube It is amazing!

                      Like

                    • makagutu says:

                      I need to do a bit of weight lifting for upper body strength. But gym ain’t my thing. I need something I can do at home. Maybe get a few weights to use at home.
                      Running and cycling give me good cardio already.

                      Like

  8. shelldigger says:

    1. I don’t have a clue, I suspect infastructure and sustainability of crops would be a factor.

    2. Time is to me both real, and an illusion. The earth has a predictable rotation, a predictable orbit, time can be assumed from these. But the reality for me, having been self employed in a dangerous job, in an unforgiving environment, for thirty years, all that mattered was daytime (when I can work,) and night time (when I could not.) Were it not for others in the house who need a clock to live by, I’d still feel the same about it. I do not wear a watch.

    3. There are some absolutes most can agree with. Water is what we understand as wet. If I hit you on the shoulder you will feel pain. Though gray areas abound here. Many understand truth as merely their way of seeing things…

    4. Those who kill for truth are unconcerned with being wrong. Either way, right or wrong, it is an example of their power. To be recognized and feared.

    5. I feel the same way about Moscow Mitch!

    6. In a faraway world, there lived a me that loved to run. There is a place you get to, you feel your power, you ride that power curve, your breathing, your exertion, perfectly matched, it feels good! I wish I could run today as I did then.

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    • makagutu says:

      1. While a lot of farms are not mechanised, crops do well in most places even without much help. Infrastructure is horrible in so many places but people can live.

      2. Interesting way to look at it.

      3. There are many other liquids that could be wet but are not water.

      5. Hahahaha

      6. Interesting thing is I didn’t run as much when I was much younger. I think it is a midlife crisis๐Ÿ˜„

      Like

      • basenjibrian says:

        Midlife crisis? Obsessive attempt to deny the reality of an aging body addicted to sugar in my case! Cheers, my running and cycling internet friend.

        It is odd these days. I have more and more in depth conversations with people thousands of miles away than I do local friends. Thanks, COVID.

        I did feel badly last week, so scheduled a test. At least as of Monday, I am infection free!

        Like

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