Public service announcement


We interrupt our irregular broadcast to bring to your attention this very important new item that reached our desk.

We will be waiting with bated breathe for this day.

About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

48 thoughts on “Public service announcement

  1. It’s working!!! I’ve already given up atheism for Islam just knowing this powerful day is coming!!!!! $Amen$

    Like

  2. Neil Rickert says:

    Come Aug 13th, when it will be obvious that this prayer has failed — these people will continue to believe in the power of prayer.

    Liked by 1 person

  3. ah, theists doing a great job again of showing how prayer utterly fails.

    Like

  4. Reblogged this on Club Schadenfreude and commented:
    hard to tell if this is just satire against theists or not. But in any case, great job of showing how prayer always fails!

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  5. jim- says:

    Prayer might not be enough. In your case some good Christian will have to cast out the evil spirit in the โ€œName of Jesusโ€ ยฉ first. Only then will you be able to believe

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  6. well it is good to see, the lunatics are keeping up in their jobs to amused us

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  7. jilldennison says:

    I would much rather see all religion gone, taking bigotry in its many forms along with it!

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    • makagutu says:

      maybe they expect us to pray about it

      Liked by 2 people

    • Barry says:

      I doubt very much that bigotry would disappear with religion. Some bigots find religion a handy blanket in which to wrap their dislike of those who are not the same as themselves. But I’m quite convinced that they would have little difficulty in finding something else to wrap their prejudices in.

      Religion, like spiritually, technology, politics, economics, nationalism, and many other human constructs can be used for good or ill. I’m not persuaded that any of them are inherently better or worse than any other. I speak as someone who has been at the receiving end of ostracism, exclusion, bullying, and violent assaults because I am perceived as being different, and as far as I’m able to determine, none of it was because of religious beliefs. In fact I have found an acceptance within an religious community that is absent in the wider society.

      Liked by 3 people

      • jilldennison says:

        Sigh … I suppose you are right, but doesn’t it seem that the churches instigate racial hatred, misogyny and more as they exclude those who are somehow ‘different’ than the bulk of their congregation? But you’re right … it is a mindset and the only way to break it is going to be through education. Yes, teach Critical Race Theory, teach about the Jim Crow era, and teach about today’s convoluted racist attacks by police. Wake the next generation up before they have the chance to follow in their parent’s footsteps.

        What I often wonder during my sleepless nights is how some people are so different in their thought processes, how some of us don’t see ethnicity, skin colour, gender identity, as something that makes a person either more or less worthy. I am so sorry to know that you, too, have been at the receiving end of bigotry and hatred. Sigh. ๐Ÿ˜ฅ

        Liked by 1 person

        • basenjibrian says:

          I (for once) agree with Barry here. Too often those of us in the “atheist community” speak of religion as some outside force, something that “does something” to people and societies. Like the factors Barry lists, religion is the result of, an emergent reality, of human society. It is created by us. I do like the idea of a mind virus that is spread by superspreaders and infects fresh minds.

          I remain somewhat skeptical that we can expect human beings to become completely rational, scientific creatures. Contrary to the claims of some atheists, “science” cannot answer every question. Despite my vehement dislike of Semitic monotheisms, I would ultimately agree with Barry that religious thought can be used for good things. Or at least as a justification for/inspiration for good things, especially in a social setting

          Liked by 1 person

          • makagutu says:

            It will be a long time before all humans become completely scientific rational beings. Plus who wants that? Comedians will have such a hard time making jokes.

            Liked by 1 person

          • jilldennison says:

            All good points. I would posit that perhaps some questions are better left unanswered rather than attempt to manufacture answers from the mind of humans. Accept that there are some things humans, despite their opposable thumbs and large brains, cannot know. Making up stories and ridiculous ‘rules’ that exclude more than half of the Earth’s population is surely not the right path.

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        • Barry says:

          Your experience of religion and especially Christian churches is, as an American, probably very different from my own, as a Kiwi. Only a third of the population here identify as Christian, and most of those are at the universal / liberal / progressive / postmodern end of the theological spectrum. Although Christian fundamentalism is making inroads here, it’s still thankfully a small minority of Christians, and hopefully that’s how it will remain.

          Bigotry seems to occur any time differences are perceived, and in my case it was primarily because I’m autistic. Many aspects of socialisation, especially as it pertains to gender identity and gender presentation never rubbed of on me. That seems to be the most significant “trigger” for the abuse I received.

          While I can do a reasonable job of appearing “typical” now that I’m in my 70s, it’s a defence mechanism that has evolved over the decades to avoid the worst of the abuse I received when younger. It can be quite exhausting to present a “normal” persona for more than a few minutes at a time.

          I would like to think that society is more accepting of differences today than in the latter half of the 20th Century, but experience has taught me that discretion is the better part of valour.

          Liked by 1 person

          • jilldennison says:

            I was raised by a Jewish father and Catholic mother, and by the age of five I had asked so many questions that they could not answer that I found I could not believe any of either religion. Then, I was sent to Catholic schools where I was singled out as “that Jew girl”, and at a very early age, I denounced religion once and for all, seeing it as only a means to exclude. Later in life, I came to realize that if, in fact, there was a ‘god’ who was a loving god and who was all-seeing, all powerful, he would not be letting things like the Vietnam War, planes falling out of the sky, and more atrocities happen.

            I do know some very good people who are Christians, but I also have very dear friends who are Muslims, Buddhists, and Jains. I judge the person by his/her actions, not by their religious beliefs, not by the colour of their skin, nor any other criteria … only by their actions.

            I never realized that you are autistic, and you have more than succeeded in proving that autism does not equate to ignorant, as some people would suggest. I have a friend who is raising his autistic son after his partner died, and it is quite a challenge, but he is doing a great job, I think.

            Liked by 3 people

      • makagutu says:

        It wouldnโ€™t end bigotry. Though with its claims of absolute truth and all, it makes some form of bigotry possible that would reduce were it to reform substantially. Some violence, especially those that find expression in religion, say, Hindu vs Islam violence in India (there is politics involved too) would possibly reduce.

        Liked by 1 person

        • Barry says:

          I don’t know. Most of my experience of religions is that they don’t make claims about absolute truth, although some of their followers do make such claims. I’ll acknowledge that fundamentalist sects/denominations of many faith traditions do make such claims, but as I often point out, they have little standing in this country. I’ll accept the situation may be different in some other countries.

          However, I think that many harms committed on people these days mostly have a political and/or an economic cause. The growing inequality between the wealthy and the poor within and between nations, I believe causes more harm on a global scale than warfare.

          Take climate change as another example. While there are deniers, most individuals and governments acknowledge the danger it poses, yet apart from token offerings, what are we as individuals and nations doing about it? How much death and suffering will result from our collective inaction? It will not affect us all equally. Those without political and/or economic power, regardless of their religion, will take the brunt of it.

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          • makagutu says:

            I don’t think I have an objection to your first point. Yes, it is the religious, who as adherents of a particular sect makes claims of being in possession of absolute truth and not all religious people do this. We have Liberal theology anyway.

            You are also right about political/economic reasons for aggression.

            On climate change, maybe the world was made for plastic and it will take over once we destroy ourselves.

            Liked by 1 person

  8. john zande says:

    I saw this!

    Oh well, it’s been fun. See you later, everyone.

    Liked by 1 person

  9. Barry says:

    I notice that they are praying for the end of atheism, not for a belief in a specific deity, so I’m wondering which of the many thousands of deities I will suddenly start believing in a week from today. The excitement and anticipation is almost unbearable!

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  10. Ron says:

    I wager this event will achieve the same results as their prayers to end world famine and poverty.

    Like

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