Making America great again


The covid vaccine way.

The US and a few other wealthy nations have announced intentions to give booster shots to their fully inoculated citizens from September in a bid to improve their immunity. This is at at time when about 5 billion humans are yet to receive the vaccine and there are people who believe this is a moral outrage.

Let’s pretend for a moment you were the policy maker and is intent on vaccine uptake at home and elsewhere, especially faced with a situation where there are vaccine skeptics, would you encourage a booster shot for the fully inoculated or would you persuade the unvaccinated to get their shots thus improving the chances of the community?

In the meantime, keep safe. And if you can, avoid staying in crowded places for long, among many other things you can do to protect yourself.

About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

170 thoughts on “Making America great again

  1. How are the African numbers?….not hearing anything. AND…..have any vaccinations been started?

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  2. That’s well put.. And I’d say then there are nations, that aren’t even able to provide one shot to every citizen.

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  3. jeannejam40 says:

    Why would anyone want someone, like myself, to take a vaccine even tho I have survived the disease and have a robust immunity? I have 100% immunity whereas the shots are giving about 30% immunity, what is wrong with this scemerio?

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    • makagutu says:

      The shots give immunity of between 85 and 95% but the efficacy declines over time. So far even those who have had the disease are still at risk of reinfection. So if you are at a place where the vaccine is available, you ought to take it especially if you interact with large crowds and have other related risk factors.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Tish Farrell says:

        According to Professor Bhakdi and many other well qualitified medics/virologists, recovered natural immunity is robust. Even big pharma MERCK announced this, saying vaccines were not as good as naturally acquired immunity. Being vaccinated on top of existent immunity is not a good idea. Everyone’s immunity status should be tested before jabbing. The odd thing about the boosters in the US is the trials on dosage seem to have scarcely started and don’t appear to conclude until May 2025. In other words, they have yet to discover the affect of re-jabbing people so soon; also to work out appropriate dosage:
        https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT04889209

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        • makagutu says:

          This is interesting. Why are they in a rush to give booster shots so soon?

          Liked by 1 person

        • Nan says:

          Being vaccinated on top of existent immunity is not a good idea. — I would say this “conclusion” comes a bit late for a lot of people

          Liked by 2 people

          • Tish Farrell says:

            Well I believe it’s a fairly long-established piece of medical knowledge.

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            • basenjibrian says:

              You miss Nan’s point. By a mile. IN the quest for the mythical herd immunity and “natural immunity” thousands and thousands and thousands have died. But sure, a random wackaloon on the internet has PROOF, PROOF I TELL YOU that the vaccines are all just a scam.

              Liked by 1 person

              • Tish Farrell says:

                Facts: everything so far known about the vaccines is provisional. They are issued under emergency use (EUA) only as there have been no long-term safety studies because they have only been around for a short time. Only yesterday did the FDA in the US give regulatory approval for Pfizer for 16 years plus, but not for younger children. They are all still in trial, not set to end until 2022/2023 depending on the product. The manufacturers’ claims for them are that they may reduce the worst symptoms and hospitalisation. They were not trialled to stop infection and transmission. In the UK doctors are reporting a rise in infection among the double jabbed. This is also happening in Israel and othe countries.

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              • Tish Farrell says:

                CDC’s definition of immunity, both natural and immunity gained through vaccination:
                https://www.cdc.gov/vaccines/vac-gen/immunity-types.htm

                Liked by 1 person

              • makagutu says:

                I think this was the case for Sweden at the very beginning when they didnโ€™t have any restrictions. But Tish is not saying guys go get infected. Just that those who have had COVID most likely have antibodies making them immune to reinfection or serious ailment and I think thatโ€™s a discussion worth having while encouraging people to get inoculated.

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        • Scottiestoybox says:

          Hello Tish. Interesting it seems we have competing sources and ideas. Dr. Francis Collins at the NIH states that the protection coverage from taking the vaccine is more wide spread to cover variants than simply getting a case of Covid can give you.

          Now, a new NIH-supported study shows that the answer to this question will vary based on how an individualโ€™s antibodies against SARS-CoV-2 were generated: over the course of a naturally acquired infection or from a COVID-19 vaccine. The new evidence shows that protective antibodies generated in response to an mRNA vaccine will target a broader range of SARS-CoV-2 variants carrying โ€œsingle letterโ€ changes in a key portion of their spike protein compared to antibodies acquired from an infection.

          These results add to evidence that people with acquired immunity may have differing levels of protection to emerging SARS-CoV-2 variants. More importantly, the data provide further documentation that those whoโ€™ve had and recovered from a COVID-19 infection still stand to benefit from getting vaccinated.

          https://directorsblog.nih.gov/2021/06/22/how-immunity-generated-from-covid-19-vaccines-differs-from-an-infection/

          So the answer to why you should get the vaccine is simply the vaccine will protect you better from more than a single strain of the virus. Hugs

          Liked by 3 people

  4. America is made up of a new species of humans called Homo Stupidous Dumbellious. A third of our population thinks the vaccines are filled with metallic tracking devices and will most likely kill them if they get them. About the same amount of Americans think the earth is flat, god made it only 5000 years ago, and praying is as effective, if not more so, than getting vaccinated to prevent covid-19 infection. We’re in deep shit here as a country. Stupid reigns as King in a land of glorious stupidity. I’m embarrassed for my country. I’ll get a booster shot, but it will do little to stop the spread of the numerous variants of covid-19 that are coming our way due to the plethora of cheese-heads who refuse to even get the first shot of the original covid-19 vaccine. Perhaps if this were another outbreak of polio or smallpox, these idiots would be behaving differently, but I greatly doubt it. Stupidity is an illness for which no amount of vaccinations can cure, sadly.

    Liked by 7 people

  5. ladysighs says:

    The only thing I will add to this discussion is that I’m staying away from this discussion. ๐Ÿ˜‰

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  6. jim- says:

    There is so much conflicting data. Just get vaccinated isnโ€™t really a logical answer.
    From Israel we now see the fully vaccinated surpassing those unvaccinated in current hospitalization.
    โ€œ few real-world epidemiologic studies exist to support the benefit of vaccination for previously infected persons, wrote the U.S. CDCโ€™s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report issued on August 6, 2021.
    Some studies show natural immunity is handling the variants just fine, so just get vaccinated? At the same time Pfizer is strong arming the poorer Latin American countries for complete immunity from lawsuits regarding the vaccination. Itโ€™s really about the money. And yes, it is unethical to serve the wealthy full immunity ahead of anyone else.
    Being skeptical about gene editing (no one knows the long term affect of this) and vaccine mandates, the money flow and the fact that science is beyond reproach, isnโ€™t that concerning? Trust the experts? Which ones? The ones with the money?
    In the back of my mind this is an extended case study of the garbage dump baboons.

    Liked by 1 person

    • makagutu says:

      There is money, a lot of involved. Just recently moderna and Pfizer increased their prices due to increased demand.
      What gamble are you ready to take? Natural immunity or vaccine? Scientists just like humans in other fields make mistakes and to believe otherwise would be naive. But to not consider inoculation because Scientists make mistakes would border on irresponsible.

      Liked by 2 people

      • jim- says:

        Does it border on irresponsible if youโ€™ve already had covid? Since scientists make mistakes, how is it irresponsible to scrutinize the data and make a personal decision contrary to the big push?
        Really my question would be, is this vaccination in the best interest of humanity propping up overpopulation and constantly fighting natural selection?

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        • makagutu says:

          Last I heard, Macron had suggested something to the effect that Africans needed family planning because of overpopulation. So in my mind, while it could be true there is overpopulation, the suggestion that people should be left to die off is an ill advised one. In the movie god on trial, a father was given an option to choose who among his two sons should live and he asks, how is he to choose?
          If you have had covid and choose not to get inoculated, I say we’ll and good. Hopefully you are immune to all the variants or can shed a new infection without hospitalization.

          Liked by 1 person

          • jim- says:

            It is unethical to cater to the wealthy over this. If someone wants/needs the vaccine they should get it regardless of what backroom negotiations are taking place.

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            • makagutu says:

              You are aware there has been vaccine nationalism from the time the vaccine was developed?

              Liked by 2 people

              • jim- says:

                Sure. I am also aware that in my small community, every single person I know that has received the vaccine has got covid sometime after. I know itโ€™s a small sampling, but I have not gotten it again even though Iโ€™ve spent time with at least ten people who did.
                Covid vaccine and boosters is becoming the new norm. For the rest of our lives we will be vaccinated. I donโ€™t see this as an enjoyable way to spend the short time we have. Thereโ€™s got to be a better way.

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        • maryplumbago says:

          When you put it like that, you have a point, unless itโ€™s you or a loved one who is dying and it could have been prevented, most likely

          Liked by 2 people

      • FYI, after my inoculation for covid, I died. 7 or 8 times. Also, I was implanted with close to 56 pounds of surveillance equipment so the “deep state” government could keep an eye on my. It’s been hell, man! Hell!!! Do you have ANY idea how hard it is to write this while bein dead AND having 56 pounds on metal tracking equipment in my right arm!!?? IT. IS. HELL!!!

        Liked by 1 person

    • Nan says:

      Some studies show … A favorite line used by individuals on BOTH sides of the fence to validate/prove their viewpoint.

      And this isn’t inclusive to COVID discussions … as I’m sure you know.

      Liked by 2 people

    • Ron says:

      Follow the money. Who’s profiting from the “vaccine” rollouts?

      Liked by 1 person

      • makagutu says:

        We expect stock prices of Pfizer to go up on Monday when they get fda licensing. The best time to buy their stocks was Friday

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        • Ron says:

          Call me foolish, but there are certain industries (Pharmaceuticals, Tobacco, US arms dealers, etc.) I will not knowingly invest in, no matter what the potential profit margin.

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          • makagutu says:

            You are not a good capitalist, Ron. You should say one thing while doing the exact opposite with your money. For example you should talk of renewable energy but put your money in oil stocks

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            • Ron says:

              That would make me a politician. And as some ancient Jewish rabbi once noted: What doth it profit a man to gain the whole world and lose his own soul?

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              • makagutu says:

                He goes to space for 11 minutes!

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                • Ron says:

                  Then I guess that’s about as close to god as one is ever likely to get. But as exciting as that “thrill ride” experience might be, I’m more attuned to the “highs” experienced while hiking and biking the wilds because they last longer and can be achieved at a fraction of the cost.

                  Liked by 1 person

                  • makagutu says:

                    I would want that thrill if i didn’t have to spend a quarter of a country’s gdp for 11 minutes of flight.
                    And i agree, hikes and rides in the wild are great

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      • jim- says:

        The same ones that are strong-arming poorer counties into deals they canโ€™t afford to sign, and not to sign.

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      • maryplumbago says:

        I do know DeSantis (the great anti mask governor in Florida) was given big bucks for his campaign (may do a presidential run in 2024)by the president or CEO of Regeneron, the drug to fight covid, so it would seem it also is big bucks to keep covid around there too.

        Liked by 1 person

  7. Ron says:

    Let’s put things in perspective:
    The WHO reports that there have been ~4400 COVID-related deaths in Kenya between 3 Jan 2020 and 5:22 CEST, 20 Aug 2021. (Source: https://covid19.who.int/region/afro/country/ke)
    So based on current population estimates of ~54 million, that represents about 0.008% of the population over the span of 20 months.
    Or viewed another way:
    World Population Review reports that there are about 807 deaths per day in Kenya. So over the span of 509 days, there were ~411k deaths in total, of which ~4400 were attributed to COVID, which works out to a death rate of ~1.07%.
    Now compare this to the annual death rates from other causes reported in 2012 (yes, it’s severely dated, but it’s the last year I could find):
    Pop (2012 est.) – 44.5 million
    Cause – 000s |% by cause | % of pop
    HIV/Aids – 54.5 | 14.8| 0.122
    Diarrhoea – 23.4 | 12.3 | 0.053
    Malnutrition – 15.3 | 6.3 | 0.034
    Birth trauma – 14.9 | 4.1 | 0.033
    Stroke – 14.5 | 4.0| 0.033
    Preterm birth – 13.5 | 3.7 | 0.030
    Malaria – 12 | 3.2| 0.027
    Tuberculosis – 9.4 | 2.5| 0.021
    Heart disease – 9.2 | 2.5| 0.021
    https://www.who.int/gho/countries/ken.pdf?ua=1
    Given that 93% of the Kenyan population is under 65 and the median age is 20.1 years (Source: CIA Factbook), you’re 12x more likely to die from diarrhea, and 3x more likely to die from malaria than from COVID.
    TL;DR
    You have bigger health problems to worry about than the vaccine availability for a low-risk disease.

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  8. Scottiestoybox says:

    Hello Mak. You ask about the booster vaccine shots for wealthy nations vs the first vaccine shots for the poor nations who have not been able to buy them yet. I think that the countries that can and have bought the vaccines should give the boosters, and they also should help the poorer countries get the first doses. The reason is that if the boosters are not given all the effort of the nation to get people vaccinated is lost as a variant overwhelms the usefulness of the vaccine. You are basically back to square one. You have to start over again, losing all the benefit you worked to gain. That makes no sense. However if we want to stop the variants we need to get the entire world vaccinated including boosters. It is a small world these days and people / viruses travel widely. So the solution is to push production world wide to the safe maximum. Hugs

    Liked by 1 person

  9. maryplumbago says:

    Iโ€™m on the fence a bit on this. Iโ€™m fully vaccinated no problems and will be 8 months in Oct. but I have read conflicting articles from reliable sources about the booster shot.
    I lean towards getting the other poor countries vaccinated first, but will that realistically happen? Many poor countries have very corrupt governments. It may take a very long time and in the meantimeโ€ฆ

    Iโ€™m old but Iโ€™m not ready to die yet, so I lean towards getting the booster..better safe than sorry notion.

    I do feel covid will either peter out eventually or variants even worse will continue to pop up and make the vaccines less capable. And we donโ€™t know which. And we donโ€™t know if it really helps to get a booster. Only time will tell that. This is all new.

    Hereโ€™s an interesting take on the boosters from The Atlantic

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2021/08/covid-booster-shots-biden-8-months/619789/

    Liked by 1 person

  10. basenjibrian says:

    I am very bothered by one of the repeated memes in this comment thread: the constant mantra that it is “all” “about the money”

    OK. How many of you work for free? Especially in a career that inoles years of training, massive capital investment, burdensome regulatory costs? OF COURSE it is about the money. We live in a capitalist society, and even ostensibly Marxist societies like China still pay their workers, worry about return on investment, and the like. Maka: Do you work for free (for commercial clients, you are a charitable guy). Should you earn more than a basic contractor who has no education or training?

    Plus, I think there is a great deal of rather snarky dismissal of the hard work needed to develop a ground breaking drug. It is not only about the money for the vast majority of researchers, I would bet. There is intellectual challenge, and yes, a commitment to solving/ameliorating a MAJOR public health crisis. It is easy to dismiss the doctors, scientists, yes regulatory experts who shepherd drugs through trials….when one is grousing on a blog.

    Yes, “Big Pharma” does some bad things (Purdue). But I trust Big Pharma far more than I do the woo-peddlers. Sure, drugs are expensive, but given that IT IS JUST WATER, the obscene pricing of homeopathic remedies, let alone dangerous drugs and chemicals promoted by “alternative” medicine is a bigger crime to me. And I certainly trust Dr. Faucci more than I do a crazy conspiracy nut or some pomaded, pompous “Bible College” preacher whose lips are still moist from doing you-know-what to Donald Trump’s tiny…

    And yes, you can find crazy claims on the web that sound plausible. None of us have the real knowledge base to really evaluate any of the claims. So…who do you trust? Despite the evident problems, I know who I ultimately have to go with.

    Liked by 1 person

    • Nan says:

      Brian, you wrote: It is not only about the money for the vast majority of researchers — and I would agree the actual researchers are most likely NOT focused on the money.

      HOWEVER, what they produce from their research is the commodity that Big Business gloms onto and turns into a bargaining chip.

      As for “woo” peddlers, I agree they are the biggest hypocrites around, but when the “market” is there (which, unfortunately, it is), they’re going to take advantage of the patsies and watch their bank accounts grow.

      Liked by 1 person

      • basenjibrian says:

        So: not to repeat myself, but how can anything not be at least partly “about the money”? I am no doctrinaire “socialist,” but I work for a government and I am not sure making drug development solely the province of government agencies is the solution, either. It costs money to develop drugs, even if some of the basic foundation research is indeed performed by nonprofit and academic entities. And ultimately, they need money, too. Academics don’t work for free.

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        • Nan says:

          I don’t think we’re on the same page here. One of us apparently missed the point of the other. But that’s OK. It happens quite frequently on the internet. ๐Ÿ˜

          Liked by 1 person

        • makagutu says:

          Of course it must be about the money. One of the reasons given for lack of vaccines for some ailments is that there is no funding for it or they donโ€™t affect the *right persons* (kidding but it could as well be true) to warrant investment.

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    • makagutu says:

      Brian I donโ€™t work for free for corporate clients. I am not a charity but I have done a lot of charity work. And it is not like I am asking they give the vaccines for free. My point is on the question of natural immunity that isnโ€™t being researched as much while the mantra is just get the vaccine. In a post I did a while back on free speech, one of the arguments for why science works is through discussion- questioning methods and results- peer review and all. To see anyone questioning the dominant storyline as not well educated is to fail to be a good scientist. If the sources are whacko, then we must say so. But credible sources must be given a hearing.
      For one, I donโ€™t trust woo peddlers. I see a lot of them starting from your last president promoting bleach to other nondescript individuals pushing zinc inhalation as a cure.
      And donโ€™t commit the sin of argument from authority. Allow yourself some room to doubt that authority if there is credible information that contradicts the position of the said authority.

      Liked by 2 people

  11. SamSahana says:

    An interesting thought indeed! Perhaps the governments should start working on vaccinating more people before proceeding with the boosters. Scrolling through the comments, Iโ€™ve been able to notice some people who prove your point about being vaccine skeptics.
    Hope the world heals quickly!

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  12. maryplumbago says:

    Some very good information hereโ€ฆas Iโ€™m not immunodeficient, Iโ€™m not in a big hurry to get the booster, plus Iโ€™m not at eight months yet.

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-021-02158-6

    Liked by 1 person

  13. Privacybadge says:

    I really think the term โ€œunvaccinatedโ€ is far too broad to be helpful. Not only does it carry the negative connotation of uninformed, lazy, dangerous, or anti-scientific, it also lumps all auto-immune diseased, priorly infected, and other medically exempt people together. It is not a one-size fits all category. Itโ€™s a said state of affairs that we cannot think outside of the boxes, vaccinated and unvaccinated, today.

    Liked by 1 person

    • makagutu says:

      Unvaccinated and republican could be synonymous at the moment regardless of where one is on this rock.

      Liked by 2 people

      • Privacybadge says:

        I assume that is supposed to be offensive in some manner? Also, not being an American, I can offer some unbiased opinion on this matter. Senator Paul is not wrong about natural immunity. Masking children without parental consent will not stem the tide of the virus, nor uphold the parents rights, and is ultimately anti-American. Democrats โ€œfleeingโ€ their duty from a โ€œdangerousโ€republican state is an absolute embarrassment to America. Nobody takes your president or his party seriously on the global stage. ๐Ÿคทโ€โ™‚๏ธ

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  14. Nan says:

    Yes, actually, that was my point. But your comment (and article reference) seemed (to me) to bypass this. Anyway, the end point was Ron Paul is hardly the person to reference as related to knowledge about the virus.

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    • Nan says:

      Sorry Mak … I meant this to be a “reply” to Ron. Not sure what I did wrong. ๐Ÿค”

      Like

    • Ron says:

      I think Privacybadge was referring to Rand Paul, because his father (Ron) practiced obstetrics and gynecology.

      But that aside, an ophthalmologist must complete the same medical program as all the other specialists; so he would at least be familiar with the basics (anatomy, physiology, neurology, microbiology, pathology, cardiology, urology, radiology, anaesthetics, immunology, etc.) of the human body in the same manner that a “brake specialist” would have a basic familiarity with how the other components of an automobile function; and like most professionals, he would have to keep abreast of new developments in other fields, even if it’s only at a superficial level.

      Moreover, in this particular case, it appears that his views are supported by those who do specialize in those fields.

      Like

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