31 thoughts on “We have a fuel crisis

  1. People can go back to riding their zebras and lions! How exciting!

    Liked by 2 people

    • makagutu says:

      It’s not looking good. Soon looks like we will be buying a litre for 2$

      Liked by 1 person

      • Barry says:

        $2? Here it’s reached more than $3 and climbing, and that’s after the government massively reduced petrol tax temporarily. Being at the end of a very long supply line that has been stretched almost to breaking point by the pandemic hasn’t helped. To make matters worse, the owners of the country’s only oil refinery are shutting it down and will only provide (limited) storage facilities for imported fuel. So far it hasn’t resulted in fuel shortages but I don’t think we can’t expect that to continue in the near future.

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        • makagutu says:

          Is that 3$ a litre? But my friend, your countrymen and women can afford this. Ours is a small economy and such an increase affects many facets of life.

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          • Barry says:

            Yes, actually $3.19 per litre. To put it in perspectve: Assuming my income is based on 2000 hours labour per year, I work for 38 minutes to pay for one litre of petrol, and 50 minutes for a loaf of bread.

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            • makagutu says:

              Bread is more expensive than fuel! That, my friend, is crazy.

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              • Barry says:

                That’s life. That’s also why I often bake bread at home. It works out at about half the cost of bought bread if you exclude my labour. To put costs into perspective, it costs me 20 hours labour for a month’s worth of Internet connection and 6 hours per month for my mobile phone.

                A kg of chicken takes 2 to 3 hours, beef and lamb from 2.5 hours to 10 hours per kg depending on cut, and fish from 3 hrs to 10 hrs per kg depending on species. Up until this year, a litre of milk cost more than a litre of petrol, which may uprise you as milk is produced locally while oil and petrol are imported.

                Oh, and if I want butter on that bread, I’d need to work for an hour and 15 minutes for a 500g block. Weight for weight, bananas are about half the price of butter. Food is expensive in Aotearoa.

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                • makagutu says:

                  Bread is .5$, milk the same. Butter is expensive but not NZ expensive. Fish is about 4.5$ a kg.
                  My phone charges is 10$ a month- this includes data and voice.

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                  • Barry says:

                    I’d be very happy if I could pay Kenyan prices!

                    The problem here is that most locally produced meat, fish, dairy and fruit is sold on the international market at premium prices and that is reflected locally. There’s no distinction between the domestic and international markets. We pay the same as wealthy Europeans and Americans pay. The same goes for NZ wines. Australian, Chilean and South African wines are cheaper here than NZ wines, but not as good.

                    I pay $30 per month for mobile phone and $100 per month for Internet but not the fastest speeds. Its 950 Mb/s download and 500 Mb/s upload the . Some providers can now do 4 or 8 Gb/s.

                    While it’s nice to know our produce is so highly regarded that it commands premium prices, it’s not a good situation when so many locals struggle to pay for it.

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                    • makagutu says:

                      I would pay $100 for 950mb/s any time. Ours is still very expensive. Coz I pay $30 for 5mbps. So our price is high for poor service

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  2. Tish Farrell says:

    All part of the state of permanent panic? With none us knowing exactly who is causing what or where.

    Liked by 1 person

    • makagutu says:

      The panic is on another level. Maybe it is time they joined me in cycling and eating bananas

      Liked by 3 people

      • nannus says:

        I guess it is both factors acting together.
        How about food prices? As long as “bike riding fuel” remains affordable, switching to the bike might do the trick at least for you. Here, we have a vegetable oil crisis. Ukraine and Russia are both big producers (especially of sun flower oil, which has totally disappeared from the market). They are also big grain producers. So some food stuffs have become more expensive. Fertilizer production also has a problem because it is based on natural gas (provided by Russia, and prices have been going up before). Do you see food prices rising?

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        • makagutu says:

          We have the same problem with vegetable oil. Everything is climbing.
          Bike riding fuel is still affordable. I don’t see bananas, watermelons and oranges getting that expensive for the short term

          Liked by 1 person

          • nannus says:

            If possible, get your own garden and grow fruits and vegetables yourself.

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            • makagutu says:

              Not possible. I live within the city. No place for a small garden

              Liked by 1 person

              • nannus says:

                When I was living in cologne, I had a vegetable patch outside the city where I went about twice a week, usually by bike ๐Ÿ™‚ A garden is also a sports device, it trains the whole body, through weeding, hacking etc. However, Nairobi is perhaps to large for such a thing to be feasible.

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    • basenjibrian2 says:

      Perhaps. or maybe we are seeing the beginning of the end or unsustainable industrial civilization? Mak and I can Mount guns on our bicycles as we li kourselvesto local warlords

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  3. renudepride says:

    Probably a combination of both reasons plus unrestricted cooperative greed! Greed perhaps at least 60% of the reason! ๐Ÿ™‚

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    • makagutu says:

      Greed is 60% of the reason. Fuel prices are controlled by the government and every 30 days there is a review. I suspect the marketers expect the review to be upwards and could be hording fuel.

      Liked by 1 person

  4. Problem everywhere. I think it’s around $2 a litre here too, but since we don’t use it, I’m not really sure.

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  5. nannus says:

    I guess it is both factors acting together.
    How about food prices?

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  6. we always had a fuel crisis, we just did not name it

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