What other corona viruses can tell us about covid19

Hope you friends have been well. There has been a dry spell of articles and posts this past week as your host was under the weather- a bad cold and bike injury. I seem to be getting better on both fronts.

I found this Article which I think is good.

They also say not to raise our hopes about a vaccine coming out soon. A safe vaccine is still months or years away.

Keep safe every one and have a pleasant weekend.

Music post

Today is Sunday and the host is not braining or doing any active thinking but I thought you would enjoy good music this weekend. So here is something to listen to while staying at home.

my week in cycling

Because I don’t want to brain today, i thought i could just tell you about my rides. I enjoy doing enduro rides (rides longer than 100km. It is time that I don’t have some times).

I ride 5 days a week with two days for rest, that is Friday and Sunday. Those two days I walk or run. I have not always been this active. I have always had a reason to not run or cycle until Covid and then the government put restrictions on movement into and out of Nairobi, encouraged employers to allow their employees to work from home. It then occurred to me I could actually be active & boy, I have tried.

This week I have been on the bike for a total of 16hrs 42 minutes, covered a distance of 407.2 km (253 miles for Muricans) and climbed a total of 5,065m (16,617,45 ft again for bloody Muricans). Why do they insist on using feet, miles and pounds?

The longest ride was 182km and the shortest 37km. I am trying to train to run 5km. Most of my runs & walks this week were a few metres short of 5km. Hopefully I will get to run 5km in under 30 minutes.

We learn

In a time of pestilence: that there are more things to admire in men than to despise.

The Plague by Albert Camus

This was a good read. And it fits the times we live in. A small happy town has been struck by the plague. First, the authorities are not sure of what to make of it. When the deaths start piling up, measures are put in place to address the pandemic. And it is in the lives of those who find themselves within the city walls that we find we are in sympathy with their situation and wish that it goes away.

Tarrou who has been busy helping the doctor in his work succumbs at the very last moment. And it is such a sad take. The priest dies too. And Othon’s little boy. The old man who’s battling asthma survives the pandemic & such is life. Unpredictable. Cruel sometimes. But also provides room for greatness.

A book I would recommend to you all.

Government in crisis: reblog

By Adam Przeworski – Democratic governments have implemented measures similar to those by autocracies in response to the pandemic. Are these value trade-offs temporary experiments, or will they be here to stay?

COVID-19 reveals the fragility of our values

Give me liberty or give me death appears, at these times that we live in to be an aberration. Billions have chosen life.

Hunger or Covid19? That’s the million dollar question for the daily wage earners.

On vice and virtue

On the whole, men are more good than bad; that, however, isn’t the real point. But they are more or less ignorant, and it is this we call vice or virtue; the most incorrigible vice being that of an ignorance that fancies it knows everything and therefore claims for itself the right to kill.

Albert Camus, The Plague