An example of misinformation


Being perpetrated online on Covid-19 and the responses by many leave me worried for some.

And it seems some section of the population is going berserk. There are at least 10 or so vaccines that are mandatory that I believe, unless you live in a cave, we have all received before age 5 and only few people refuse to get them & usually evidence is required when you start school. Now that several places are asking for evidence for covid vaccination, there are suits in courts about my body my choice freedom which I find interesting.

Anyway, I hope vaccine nationalism will pave way to universal access ๐Ÿ˜€ especially as I have heard prices of the vaccines have gone up by between a quarter and a tenth. I think so far only the J& J or Astra Zeneca shots are available here. I will wait for the more expensive jabs n tell you all how it goes.

Meanwhile keep safe everyone.

About makagutu

As Onyango Makagutu I am Kenyan, as far as I am a man, I am a citizen of the world

50 thoughts on “An example of misinformation

  1. Neil Rickert says:

    The insanity pandemic seems even worse than the COVID pandemic.

    Liked by 3 people

  2. Remember, Mak, I DIED from my Covid shots!!! I’ve been dead noe for 3 months and, boy, but do I STINK!!! Look, when have conspiracy lunatics EVER been wrong?! Huh?! WHEN??!! ๐Ÿ™‚

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  3. renudepride says:

    Hopefully, this doesn’t become the “normal” for all of us. The speed with which humanity created the numerous COVID-19 “vaccines” makes me wonder about their a) effectiveness and b) worthiness. I guess time will let us know the results. Until then, “mask up” or retreat into the isolated “caves!” Naked hugs! ๐Ÿ™‚

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    • makagutu says:

      A cave is good but be careful there are no bats. As for efficacy, I have seen reports that show they are way up there in preventing serious sickness, reducing hospitalization among others.

      Liked by 1 person

      • renudepride says:

        Hopefully, there are no long-term consequences!

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        • makagutu says:

          Long term consequences of the virus include death which last I heard, only Jeff has come back from 3 times. From the vaccine, at the moment, too early to tell if there are or will be any. It is less than a year since it was developed but at least as to stopping illness, I have read it works.

          Liked by 2 people

          • Barry says:

            It seems that around 10% of those who catch covid-19 develop what is being termed Long Covid. What the consequences of that will be long term is still an unknown, but as it can affect multiple internal organs including the heart, they could be quite serious. Scientists here are calling for volunteers who have been diagnosed as having had the virus to join a longitudinal study on post covid symptoms.

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  4. We had Pfizer for our first, Moderna for our second. Astra was not even on offer for those of us over age 65. J&J never even got here. I think you’re wise to wait for the better ones for your age group.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Barry says:

    The only mandatory vaccination in Aotearoa New Zealand that I’m aware of is for covid, and even then its compulsory only for those working at the border. For example customs and security officers, stevedores, international Air crews, quarantine staff etc.

    Attitudes may change in the wake of covid but at the moment I don’t see an appetite for mandatory vaccinations being accepted here even for school age children. Even the idea of coercion is unpopular, although strangely the (libertarian political party) ACT is in favour of it.

    Most vacations are offered free and the uptake has generally been slightly above the minimum for herd immunity to be effective.

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    • makagutu says:

      the vaccines for ages 0-5 are offered either free or at a nominal fee and they are usually mandatory. one is required to show proof of vaccination when they take their child for pre-primary school.
      i think because of the challenges in the providing the vaccine, the government hasn’t made the covid vaccine mandatory. i have seen that so far only about 2mn have been vaccinated and of those only about 700K have received both doses.

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  6. look at it from the bright side, less pollution, less people, all good for the survival of the planet

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  7. Ron says:

    Bodily autonomy is kind of the bedrock principle upon which all other human rights rest. If you have no control over your own body, then you really have no freedom at all.

    That said, for those who have have built up strong immune system by taking care of their health the vaccine is about as useful as an air conditioner in the Antarctic.

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    • makagutu says:

      While I want to agree, I think vaccines such as those we got as babies do not take away freedom. Whether bodily autonomy is the bedrock of other rights is also questionable.

      What would you say about those who even after being inoculated suffered breakthrough infections?

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      • Ron says:

        I think the overriding moral principle stands: what grants anyone the right to dictate what another person may do with (or put into) their body?

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        • makagutu says:

          Duty of care? Why should anyone be left to die of preventable diseases? But if your argument was to be drawn to its logical conclusion, we are left to ask why should anyone bring anyone to life? Why give birth?

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          • Ron says:

            I asked what grants anyone the (moral) right to dictate what another person may do with (or put into) their body. The main axiom I’m proposing here is that you do not possess the moral right to initiate (or threaten to initiate) force against others, or to coerce them to act against their wishes without their express consent. (With the caveat that we’re talking about mature, rational actors possessing the mental capacity to make informed decisions — which would exclude children and the mentally deficient).

            “Duty of care” is a legal obligation under tort law not to cause foreseeable harm upon others. How does this fit into the above scenario?

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            • makagutu says:

              Does the vaccine cause harm or is it likely to cause foreseeable harm? Only in very rare cases have there been admissions following adverse reactions with the vaccine.
              Here the requirement for inoculation has been voluntary though I read the government has or is about to issue a directive requiring all government employees to get the jab.

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              • Ron says:

                The question remains: do I possess the moral right to force you to inject a foreign substance into your body against your wishes? It’s a yes/no answer.

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                • makagutu says:

                  No, you don’t.
                  In as much the same way you don’t have a right to stop me from harming myself.
                  The question is do we have an obligation to others, say in times of a pandemic or any other time for that matter?

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                  • Ron says:

                    No. The only obligations you have towards others are the ones you voluntarily choose to take upon yourself. I realize it sounds callous, but your (in a general sense) needs and desires do not grant you the right to present a claim demanding fulfillment of those needs and desires by others. For example: men NEED sexual gratification. Does that obligate women to grant sexual favours to any man who asks?

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        • Nan says:

          You tend to take a very individualistic approach … which is your right and privilege. But we live on a planet of a few million people and pretty much everything we do affects someone else in one way or another. Sometimes good. Sometimes bad.

          The thing is, especially with COVID-19, while you are expounding on your personal liberties and refusing to act in ways to protect others, you could very well be sending a person with health problems to the ICU … and possibly his/her death … since it’s been proven the virus can exist in some people without them ever experiencing symptoms.

          I’m no different than you in many ways. I want to be able to live my life as I choose. But many, many years ago — especially after having children — I discovered that personal wants/needs often must take a back seat in order to benefit someone else’s life.

          Liked by 2 people

          • basenjibrian says:

            My main question for Ron is how he would be able to participate in our discussions when he is living on an isolate island in the middle of the South Pacific. The only place where pure 100% “bodily autonomy” makes sense in the context of a highly contagious virus.

            Liked by 2 people

          • Ron says:

            I argue towards a moral principle: the liberty to pursue one’s own private interests unmolested by others, so long as you extend the same courtesy to others by leaving them alone to pursue their own private interests unmolested by you.

            Most people seem to agree with that principle, but then immediately attempt to contravene it by finding qualifiers and exceptions.

            As to COVID (or any other disease, for that matter), your health is your responsibility, and obesity is a major risk factor for C-19 hospitalizations. (See: https://hub.jhu.edu/2020/06/01/david-kass-obesity-covid-19). In fact, obesity and the development of insulin resistance due to obesity are deemed the primary risk factors for many degenerative diseases (such as type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, renal failure, etc.) that are largely preventable with a simple change in diet and/or lifestyle.

            So arguing that it should be permissible to infringe upon the liberties of the healthy for the sake of the unhealthy seems downright bizarre and opens the door to all manner of abuse, because any action or inaction taken by one person carries the potential to harm another.

            And yes, having children forces you to put their needs ahead of yours; but that was a self-imposed tradeoff — not one imposed upon you by unrelated third parties.

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            • makagutu says:

              There are cases, I have read, of young and healthy people contracting and dying of c-19. Is your argument that they must have had other comorbidities?
              Though as Barry says, only those working at places where there is high risk are required to be inoculated, maybe those who live in basements and use uber foods need not get it as long as they don’t intend to get out and mix with others in a club as they may contract the virus

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              • Ron says:

                I’m arguing to the stats published by the CDC, which can be found here:

                https://www.cdc.gov/nchs/nvss/vsrr/covid_weekly/index.htm#Comorbidities

                Within the text it states:

                “For over 5% of these deaths, COVID-19 was the only cause mentioned on the death certificate. For deaths with conditions or causes in addition to COVID-19, on average, there were 4.0 additional conditions or causes per death.”

                IOW, the COVID death toll is really reporting “died with COVID” rather than “died of COVID”.

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  8. The confusion coursed by the experimental covid vaccines and their public rollout may be compared with the biblical tale about the confusion of Babel and the resulting aftermath.

    Like

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